Zandomeneghi, account

Federico Zandomeneghi

(1841-1917)

Account

of his exhibited works

 

 

 

 

The 4th impressionist exposition of 1879:

General overview:

  • catalogue numbers 242-246
  • so in total Zandomeneghi exhibited in 1879 5 works, including 2 portraits.
    • 2x time indication of place, two of Venice
    • 1x indication of time, season or weather
    • 0x a study
    • 0x loans (appartient à…)
  • See for the suggestions of Moffett (R2,p271) and of Berson (R90II,p120+142); they refer to Piceni (1967 + 1979)

reviews:
Diego Martelli (1879/07/05) reviewed ‘Zandomeneghi, who entered the ranks of this group for the first time, and who had already made two studies in Venice a few years ago, one of which was beautiful (no. 244+245), showed how even in Italy artists called Coroneta worked independently of the modern French movement and walked a good path, by lovingly and without preconceptions study nature. In fact, those Coronetas are a page of genuine impressionism, written eight or ten years ago on the banks of the Grand Canal. Next to the Coronetas, he had exhibited a portrait of a Parisian woman of extraordinary character; figure of a girl laughing, coquettishly displaying two rows of beautiful teeth, hysterical body in an armoured suit of the highest order. (no.246) Zandomeneghi is to be praised immensely, and above all, because he is the only Italian who has joined this phalanx of independents.’ (R90I,p232)
F.-C. de Syène (1879/05/01) reviewed ‘Paintings of a fresh, rich and intense tone are boldly painted by. M. Zandomenighi (sic).’ (R90II,p243).

1879 catalogue: (R2,p271;R90I,p208;iR1)

4IE-1879-242, Portrait de M. Diego Martelli
Moffett suggests Piceni 35, so does Berson, now: 1879, Portrait of Diego Martelli, 72×92, GAM Florence  (R2,p271+289;R90II,p120+142). Diego Martelli was an art-critic.

4IE-1879-243, Portrait de M. C…
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion. Berson refers to a review in Le Soir in which only the title is mentioned (R90I,p241).

4IE-1879-244, Un canal de Venise
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion. Berson refers to the reviews of Martelli and de Syène (an interesting view on Venice), which could also refer to no.245.

4IE-1879-245, Une industrie vénitienne
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion. Berson refers to the reviews of Martelli and de Syène (an interesting view on Venice), which could also refer to no.244.

4IE-1879-246, Violettes d’hiver
Eng.: Winter violets. Moffett suggests with a perhaps Piceni 37, Paolo Stramezzi, Crema, Berson follows, now: 1879, Jeune femme au manchon blanc, 135×63, xx (R2,p271;R90II,p120+142).

 

The 5th impressionist exposition of 1880:

General overview:

  • catalogue numbers 225-232
  • so in total Federico Zandomeneghi exhibited in 1880 8 works, including 4 fans and 2 portraits.
    • 0x time indication of place
    • 0x indication of time, season or weather
    • 1x a study
    • 0x loans (appartient à…)
  • See for the suggestions of Moffett (R2,p314/5) and of Berson (R90II,p157/8+175); they refer to Piceni (1967 + 1979)

reviews:
Armand Silvestre (1880/05/01) reviewed ‘Tell me about Mr Zandomeneghi. This one is in the true tradition of the intransigent.;  (R90I,p308).

1880 catalogue: (R2,p314/9;R90I,p263;iR1)

5IE-1880-225, Mère et fille
Moffett suggests Piceni (1967) no.40, Berson follows, now: 1879, Mother and daughter, 62×52, collection of Mr. Giuliano Matteucci, Viareggio (R2,p314+333;R90II,p157+175). the picture depicts Zandomeneghi’s mother, Anna and his sister, Antonietta, who visited the artist in Paris in 1879.

5IE-1880-226, Portrait de M. Lanciani
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion. Berson suggests: 1880, Le Dandy, 72×45, private (R90II,p158+175), she refers to Piceni (1967) no.42 and a review of Bertall.

5IE-1880-227, Portrait  de M. Paul Alexis
Moffett mentions this work has been lost (R2). Rewald mentions, that it was a strange portrait, with Alexis standing against a wall to which were affixed innumerable birdcages with canaries (R1,p439;R88II,p155), he refers to the review of Silvestre, who indicates he didn’t like it completely (R90I,p308). Huysmans reviewed ‘A portrait of a man with a hat on his head leaning against a room full of bird cages is also interesting for the sincerity it exudes.’ (R90I,p289). Berson also notes (referring to Monneret 1978, 34) that this painting was exhibited at the Salon of 1879 (R90II,p158). But Zandomeneghi didn’t exhibit at the Salon of 1879 (aR1). Nor could I find this remark with Monneret (R88II,p153-159).

5IE-1880-228, étude
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion, nor does Berson, there were no reviews. 

5IE-1880-229, Éventail
5IE-1880-230, Éventail
5IE-1880-231, Éventail
5IE-1880-232, Éventail
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion for these 4 fans. Berson refers to reviews of Dalligny and Silvestre (1880/05/01), but they don’t describe the fans.

 

 

The 6th impressionist exposition of 1881:

General overview:

  • catalogue numbers 166-170
  • so in total Federico Zandomeneghi exhibited in 1881 5 works, including 2 portraits and 1 drawing.
    • 1x time indication of place
    • 0x indication of time, season or weather
    • 1x a study
    • 1x loans (appartient à…): M. G. (no. 169)
  • See for the suggestions of Moffett (R2,p356) and of Berson (R90II,p187+197); they refer to Piceni (1967 + 1979)

reviews:
x

1881 catalogue: (R2,p356;R90I,p328;iR1)

6IE-1881-166, La place d’Anvers
Moffett suggests Piceni  (1967) no. 44, Berson follows, now: 1880, La place d’Anvers, 100×135, Galleria d’arte Moderna Ricci Oddi, Piacenza (R2,p356+369;R90II,p187+197). Huysmans calls it ‘is nothing but ordinary’ (R90I,p354).

6IE-1881-167, Etude
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion. Berson suggests: 18xx, L’Appuntamento (Au bois de Boulogne), xx, xx (R90II,p187+197). She refers to Piceni (1967) no.285 and to the reviews of Enjoiras, Geffroy, Huysmans and de Villars. Enjoiras (1881/04/12) reviewed ‘In the same style, M. Zandonuneghi (sic) offers a charming head of a young girl, sketched with a few flat tents, almost nothing; it is an exquisite and lively figure. The rest, dress and hat hardly brushed, are of a very right tone; and that makes it a canvas in front of which one stops, as in front of a found vision.’ (R90I,p340). Gustave Geffroy (1881/04/19) reviewed ‘Mr. Zandomeneghi’s portrait of a woman, painted in a simple and strong manner, promises a sincere artesian in search of clarity and modernity.’ (R90I,p343). Huysmans reviewed ‘and his bust of a seated woman, with her back against a tree, can hardly be distinguished from the paintings of M. Béraud and M. Goeneutte.’ (R90I,p354). Nina de Villars (Villard) just calls it ‘a charming parisian girl’ (R90I,p371).

6IE-1881-168, Portrait, dessin
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion. Berson refers to a review of de Mont. (1881/04/21) who reviewed ‘The black pencil portrait of Mr. de Zandomeneghi (sic) is of a good student; if it would be the signature of a candidate to the School of Fine Arts, it would surprise no one. By this drawing, Mr. Zandomeneghi belongs to my second category; by his painting, he would belong to the first. ‘ (R90I,p361).

6IE-1881-169, Panneau pour une salle à manger; appartient à M. G.
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion. Berson refers to a review of Dalligny, who reviewed ‘as well as the dining room panel of Mr. F. Zandomeneghi, are more done than it is appropriate for impressionists; for our part, we will not complain about it.’ (R90I,p335).

6IE-1881-170, Portrait de M.L.
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion. Berson refers to a review in Le Petit Parisien, who calls it ‘Portrait de M. L.-M.’ (R90I,p363).

 

The 8th impressionist exposition of 1886:

General overview:

  • catalogue numbers 235-246
  • so in total Federico Zandomeneghi exhibited in 1886 12 works, all without title, 4 oil paintings and 8 pastels.
    • 0x time indication of place
    • 0x indication of time, season or weather
    • 0x a study
    • 0x loans (appartient à…)
  • See for the suggestions of Moffett (R2,p447) and of Berson (R90II,p254/5+278/9); they refer to Piceni (1967 + 1979)

reviews:
Paul Adam (1886/04) reviewed ‘More luminous (than Degas), the flesh that Mr. Zandomeneghi paints, also denote a beautiful knowledge of the line. One would love the young lady who is sitting on a beast’s skin, if the flame of the fireplace flamed and burned (no. 244). Another washes her breast in a delicious blue glow, among the blue and white cleanliness of a toilet (no. 241). Mr. Zandomeneghi, who shows a lot of talent, should take care to avoid the fake sweet and the blue. This will cost him a lot of work, because the paintings where he wants to avoid this tendency sink into an outrageous and false violence. Thus, the wine-colored faces of the three characters dining under the reflection of the gas lamps. Too easy an effect (no.235).’ (R90I,p428).
Jean Ajalbert (1886/06/20) reviewed ‘Mr. ZANDOMENEGHI is naturally seduced by the grace, the softness and the nonchalance. He likes the woman’s tasty flesh, sensual mouth, deep eyes, sculptural thighs; he wants her naked. Oh! it is no longer the scoundrel of geometrical corsets, the upright of the dark eyes, the mediocre dandy of Forain! but full women, in oriental poses. We have all the morbidness that can be expected from a Venetian. (…) All are drawn with a love of line, passionately. These qualities of grace, softness, smoothness, purity of contours are found in the painting which represents a girl, seen from behind, in front of the fireplace; (no.246?) (…) These scenes of great truth have the disadvantage of fitting into an order of banal subjects, explicated by false modernities.’ (R90I,p431).
George Auriol (1886/05/22) reviewed ‘One stops with great pleasure in front of the paintings of Mr. Zandonmeneghi. His Brasserie is surprisingly well observed. There is in this brasserie a stupefying truthfulness. Everyone who has ever set foot in a tavern stops and says: <I know this one! > I think you know her. It is her, isn’t it? (no. 235) Further on, Deux femmes nues se lavant. (no. 241+242) ‘ (R90I,p434).
Jules Christophe (1886/06/13) reviewed ‘The same observation applies to M. Federico Zandomeneghi, who shows some boldness only under no. 235 (the interior of a café, two men with a woman of light morals), but who is purely exquisite with his portrait of a woman breathing a bouquet (even better than that of Forain) and his distinct pastels from no. 239 to 246.’ (R90I,p437).
Rodolphe Darzens reviewed ‘Mr Zandomenghi (sic) exhibits a remarkable series of pastels: here is an indoor scene, a skinny, naked child drying herself in front of the fireplace (no.246?); then a woman crouching before a fire (no. 244), and especially this delightful study of a young girl washing her breasts (no.241).’ (R90I,p439).
Félix Fénéon (1886/05/21) reviewed ‘In his four paintings and eight pastels, Zandomeneghi betrays his Venetian origin. – Themes. (…) In rooms of light, these female bodies are shaped, never bruised, never weary, but young and firm too, certainly, to mix personal fragrances with those of the flasks; this thin cloth folds into delicate and lucid blue greens, fits together, roses then violated so little, on greasy flesh. Literary intentions, perhaps, in the play of faces, in the order of the interior where a musician in a light polka-dot dress abounds. (no. 238) An indifference to figuring the ambient colour work on the tone of its characters, – this woman with the blaze so unusually unaffected by focal light, or, at least, an incomplete notation of chromatic reactions, – this table of night restaurants. (no. 235) Works of an interesting painter especially by his linear research, fond of elegance.’ (R90I,p442).
Henry Fèvre reviewed ‘Mr. Zandomeneghi, with a meager and less personal talent, gives to his female nudes coquetry and prettiness, silkiness and satin to the skin, clarity and gaiety to the light. ‘ (R90I,p446/7)
Marcel Fouquier (1886/05/16) reviewed ‘This boldness in the effect sought and this exquisite accuracy in decisive strokes also make a singularly happy debut of Mr. Zandomeneghi’s paintings and pastels.’ (R90I,p449)
Gustave Geffroy (1886/05/26) reviewed ‘Four paintings and eight pastels. The Young Man at the Piano and the Woman Reading (no. 238), the Child Warming her Shirt (no.246), bear witness above all to the observer who is sure of his vision and master of his drawing.’ (R90I,p450).
H. (1886/06/11) reviewed in ‘Le journal des arts’: ‘We will mention the pastels of Mr. Zandomeneghi, obviously a colourist, but not a draughtsman/ drawer;’ (R90I,p452).
Emile Hennequin (1886/06/19) reviewed ‘Mr. Zandomeweghi (sic) excels in intimate undressing; a woman of his, crouching naked in front of a tub, her flesh is rendered extremely truthful (no. 241 / 242) while an interior scene in an elegant salon reveals the awkwardness of a (female?) pianist playing to a woman. (no.238)’ (R90I,p454).
Maurice Hermel (1886/05/28) reviewed ‘The proximity of Mr. Degas does Mr. Sandomeneghi (sic) great harm. His nudity is eccentric: he is looking for sensual pleasure and if he encounters it sometimes, as in the woman painted in front of the fire, the body is gracefully bent in a clever foreshortening (no.244), more often than not it is only heavy and vulgar. His brush lavishes bluish and violet tones on the flesh; his women look like frostbite: this is no more truthful and even less pleasant than the whipped cream of the Caroluses. (…) The rest is rather common in expression and almost always gated by awkward insistence.’ (R90I,p457).
Labruyère (1996/05/28) reviewed ‘Mr Zandomeneghi imitates Mr Degas. I hasten to say that I do not believe in an intention to <copy> but that it is without his knowledge that this artist is inspired by one of the masters of his school. Skill, the “doing”, is Mr. Zandomeneghi’s dominant quality. A little personality, and he would be a charming painter. (…)’ (R90I,p460).
Octave Maus (1886/06/27) reviewed ‘Zandomeneghi presents four oil paintings and eight pastels. (…)’ (R90I,p463).
J. M. Michel (1886/05/18) reviewed ‘It must be said, moreover, that among all the nudes in this new Salon there are some very well treated pastels, notably M. Zandomeneghi’s 241, or a young girl who is teasing the tip of her breast, 242 and 243, various transformations of the same toilet until the moment of  powdering and blushing, covered like the Indian in his war paint, the model will emerge to face the struggle for life.’ (R90I,p465).
Octave Mirbeaux (1886/05/21) reviewed ‘Mr. Zandomeneghi is very much inspired by Mr. Degas, except that he graces and beautifies him. He has a lot of skill, too much skill, I would prefer a clearer personality. And then, by dint of trying to find the graceful, one quickly falls into the fake sweet. Yet Mr. Zandomeneghi has talent, craftsmanship and a smooth touch. But he will only really be someone when he decides to be himself. Too much hand, in fact, and not enough eye. (…)’ (R90I,p466).
Moniteur des arts (1886/05/21) reviewed ‘M. Zandomeneghi, studies of women, squatting or washing (no.241-243), which are more accomplished than the paintings of many of his colleagues.’ (R90I,p467).

1886 catalogue: (R2,p447;R90I,p425;iR1)
The very common titles in the catalogue alone make identification hard. Fortunately there were detailed descriptions in the many reviews. Moffett suggests: Piceni 92, Piceni 270 (Mario Borgiotti, Milan), Piceni 307 (private collection in Turin) and perhaps Piceni 46 (Camillo Giussani, Erba). Berson also suggests Piceni 270, she is more precise in her suggestions and arbitrary connects them with the catalogue numbers.

8IE-1886-235, Peinture
8IE-1886-236, Peinture
8IE-1886-237, Peinture
8IE-1886-238, Peinture
Eng.: painting.

8IE-1886-235, Peinture (Scène de café)
Now: 1885, Alla “Nouvelle Athènes”, 90×70, private Italy (R90II,p254+278). Berson refers to Piceni (1967) no.17 and to the reviews of Adam, Ajalbert, Auriol (‘Brasserie’), Christophe (‘no. 235), Fénéon, Fèvre. It is Christophe, who explicitly renders this painting no. 235 and calling it ‘l’intérieur d’un café‘ and describes ’two men with a woman of light morals’. Adam reviewed ’the wine-colored faces of the three characters dining under the reflection of the gas lamps.’ Ajalbert decribed ’then a café scene. The end of dinner, empty bottles, toothpicks, under the smoke of cigarettes; two men, one of whom is reflected in the mirror where the globes of the gas are also reflected. A girl with the unspeakable command smile thinks of nothing; her fingers hold a cigarette, where breadcrumbs are rolled. Her faded figure, her stunted stature, the weariness of a body fashioned to all shades, retain a shadow of youth that the artist has rendered well.’

8IE-1886-236, Peinture (Jeune fille aux oeillets)
Now: 18xx, Jeune fille aux oeillets (Girl with carnations), 38×45, xx (R90II,p254+278), referring to Piceni (1967), no.270 and to the reviews of Christophe, Fouquier, and Labruyère. Fouquier reviewed ‘The young woman with a tired and gentle look breathing in a bouquet of violets is all in a delicate and deliciously tender range of tones. One understands better, contemplating it for a minute, Baudelaire’s line: And your eyes attractive like those of a portrait.’ Labruyère reviewed ‘His portrait of a woman breathing in a bouquet is of great sensitivity and moves you like the evocation of an absolutely living figure.’

8IE-1886-237, Peinture (Portrait d’homme; portrait de vieil homme à barbe grise)
Now: 1881, Ritratto del dottore, 66×54, xx (R90II,p254+278), referring to Piceni (1967) no.46 and to the reviews of Ajalbert, Darzens and Mirbeau. Ajalbert reviewed ‘We also notice a superb portrait of a man, a figure of delicious honesty’. Mirbeau reviewed ‘I also like his portrait of an old man with a grey beard.’

8IE-1886-238, Peinture (Jeune homme au piano (et la femme lisant)
Berson leaves this work unidentified and notes ‘It is unclear whether this work is a pastel or a painting’. She refers to reviews of Ajalbert, Darzens, Fénéon, Geffroy, Hennequin and Maus. Ajalbert reviewed ‘and in an interior scene: a woman in a polka dot dress is leafing through an album; next to her, her dog, blue ribbons around her neck; further on, a gentleman is playing the piano. Fénéon reviewed ‘Literary intentions, perhaps, in the play of faces, in the order of the interior where a musician in a light polka-dot dress abounds.’ Geffroy reviewed ‘The Young Man at the Piano and the Woman Reading.’ Maus calls this work ‘Jeune homme au piano‘.

8IE-1886-239, Pastel
8IE-1886-240, Pastel
8IE-1886-241, Pastel
8IE-1886-242, Pastel
8IE-1886-243, Pastel
8IE-1886-244, Pastel
8IE-1886-245, Pastel
8IE-1886-246, Pastel
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion for these 8 pastels. Berson renders several suggestions and arbitrary connects them with the catalogue numbers. Berson also mentions reviews of Christophe and H., that refer to one of the pastels.

8IE-1886-239, Pastel (Petite fille qui étudie)
Eng.: Little girl studying. Berson leaves this work unidentified and refers to the review of Auriol. Berson notes ‘It is unclear whether this work is a pastel or a painting’. Auriol describes ‘His Petite fille qui étudie is painted with great delicacy; I would be satisfied with this little hand in the clutter of hair: it is of impeccable drawing.’

8IE-1886-240, Pastel (Une femme abattue sur des oreillers; femme couchée sur le ventre?)
Eng.: Woman struck down on pillows. Berson leaves this work unidentified and refers to the review of Fénéon. Berson notes ‘It is unclear whether this work is a pastel or a painting’. Fénéon described ‘Slumped on pillows, joined palms above her hair, she curves her back against a wallpaper wherein greens, reds and yellows swibe.’ . Ajalbert reviewed ‘Another, lying on her stomach, raised on her elbows, fixes her eyes to the gems of a bracelet encircling her wrist and the curved line of her loins bulges voluptuously at the fat croup, and the body shows through and takes shape, and clarity comes through her thin shirt.’ (Nl. ‘Een ander, op haar buik liggend, opgeheven op haar ellebogen, fixeert haar ogen op de edelstenen van een armband die haar pols omcirkelt en de gebogen lijn van haar lendenen puilt wulps uit op haar dikke achterwerk, en het lichaam wordt zichtbaar en krijgt vorm, en helderheid komt door haar dunne shirt.’). According to Berson this refers to no.243, but I think it fits better no.240.

8IE-1886-241, Pastel (La Toilette; Jeune femme qui se lave le sein)
Berson suggests: 18xx, La Toilette, oil on canvas, 15×22, xx (R90II,p255+279), Berson refers to Piceni (1967) no. 307 and several reviews of which several state it was a pastel, while the Piceni work is an oil. It is Michel who describes no. ‘241’ as ‘a young girl who is teasing the tip of her breast’. Adam described ‘Another washes her breast in a delicious blue glow, among the blue and white cleanliness of a toilet.’ Ajalbert describes ‘This one, flave, and the white sponge on her amber throat washes among the white and blue porcelain;’ Darzens reviewed ’this delightful study of a young girl washing her breasts’. Fénéon describes ’the shirt tied at the waist, so calm and full of graceful care, leaning over a bowl with blue laces, she washes, slowly, her breasts.’ Labruyère reviewed ‘But I even more prefer his Femme qui se lave le sein. The hand movement is exquisite and almost childlike in its charm. All surrounding objects, furniture and toiletries, are rendered with sincerity.’ Maus reviewed ‘Particularly noteworthy is Jeune femme à sa toilette, attentively sponging, with almost devotion, the delicately modelled globe of her throat in front of a marble basin,’.  Mirbeau calls it ‘Femme qui se lave le sein‘ and adds ‘is nevertheless quite charming, the movement of the hand is elegant and full of sensitivity; the whole still life is amiably rendered.’

8IE-1886-242 (Femme à sa toilette; femme nue accroupie devant un bassin)
Berson leaves this work unidentified and refers to the reviews of Auriol, Hennequin and Michel. Michel describes no. ‘242 and 243’ as ‘various transformations of the same toilet until the moment of  powdering and blushing’. Auriol writes about ‘Deux femmes nues se lavant‘, according to Berson refering to no.241 and 242, but maybe it refers to no. 242+243. Hennequin reviewed ‘Mr. Zandomeweghi (sic) excels in intimate undressing; a woman of his, crouching naked in front of a tub, her flesh is rendered extremely truthful’, according to Berson referring to no. 241+242, but maybe it refers to no. 242+243.

8IE-1886-243, Pastel (femme à sa toilette; femme nue se lavant; femme couchée sur le ventre?)
Berson leaves this work unidentified and refers to the reviews of Ajalbert, Auriol, Hennequin and Michel. Michel describes no. ‘242 and 243’ as ‘various transformations of the same toilet until the moment of  powdering and blushing’. Ajalbert described ‘Another, lying on her stomach, raised on her elbows, fixes her eyes to the gems of a bracelet encircling her wrist and the curved line of her loins bulges voluptuously at the fat croup, and the body shows through and takes shape, and clarity comes through her thin shirt.’ (Nl. ‘Een ander, op haar buik liggend, opgeheven op haar ellebogen, fixeert haar ogen op de edelstenen van een armband die haar pols omcirkelt en de gebogen lijn van haar lendenen puilt wulps uit op haar dikke achterwerk, en het lichaam wordt zichtbaar en krijgt vorm, en helderheid komt door haar dunne shirt.’). Note: the reviews of Michel and Ajalbert correspond, maybe the last one refers to no.240. Auriol writes about ‘Deux femmes nues se lavant‘, according to Berson refering to no.241 and 242, but maybe it refers to no. 242+243. Hennequin reviewed ‘ ‘Mr. Zandomeweghi (sic) excels in intimate undressing; a woman of his, crouching naked in front of a tub, her flesh is rendered extremely truthful’, according to Berson referring to no. 241+242, but maybe it refers to no. 242+243.

8IE-1886-244, Pastel (Femme se chauffant; Jeune femme nue accroupie devant la flambée du foyer)
Eng.: Woman warming herself. Berson suggests: 18xx, Femme se chauffant, pastel on paper, 64×64, private (R90II,p255+279), referring to Piceni (1967) no.92 and several reviews. Adam described ’the young lady who is sitting on a beast’s skin, if the flame of the fireplace flamed and burned’. Ajalbert decribes ‘This one dries in the fire, spread out on the carpets and furs, the reflections of the burning coals pass over it.’ Darzens reviewed ‘a woman crouching before a fire’. Fénéon described ‘It is, seen from behind and in an almost vertical projection, a woman sitting on white bear rugs, in front of cokes, naked, with her knees raised and her arms sliding around them: on the left, a complicated and rhythmic trace where the leg and foot is closely related to the curve of the armpit; on the right, a line, single, fast and pure, connecting the bottom to the shoulder to get lost in a hairdo whose wild colour combines with the sharp green of the oriental slipper.’ Hermel reviewed ’the woman painted in front of the fire, the body is gracefully bent in a clever foreshortening’. Maus calls it ‘Jeune femme nue‘, adding ‘crouching in front of the fireplace’ (Nl. gehurkt).

8IE-1886-245, pastel (Femme devant une cheminée; Femme nue assise devant une cheminée)
Eng.: Woman in front of a fireplace. Berson leaves this work unidentified and refers to reviews of Ajalbert, Darzens and Fénéon. Ajalbert described ‘An undressed woman is sitting on a chair in front of a fireplace, of which we only see the marble. The invisible flame makes the blood flow to her cheekbones. Her flesh lights up luminously with caressing degradations of tints.’ Fénéon describes ‘Sitting on the edge of a chair in a half-twisted position, she rests her chin on the backrest of her crescent hands and, fire in the cheeks and eyes, ready for imminent gymnastics, dream. – ‘

8IE-1886-246, pastel (Une Gamine chauffant sa chemisette; petite fille (nue) chauffer sa chemise)
Eng.: A Girl Heating Her Blouse. Berson leaves this work unidentified and refers to reviews of Ajalbert, Darzens, Fèvre and Geffroy and Maus. Ajalbert, maybe referring to this number reviewed ‘These qualities of grace, softness, smoothness, purity of contours are found in the painting which represents a girl, seen from behind, in front of the fireplace;’. Darzens, probably referring to this number, reviewed ‘an indoor scene, a skinny, naked child drying herself in front of the fireplace’. Fèvre described ‘A little girl heating her blouse in front of the fireplace has a lot of body heat and the pinkish skin of a girl, and her loose hair is very comically wild.’ Geffroy wrote ’the Child Warming her Shirt’. Maus calls this work ‘l’Enfant faisant chauffer sa chemise‘.

 

Federico Zandomeneghi at the Salon:
Zandomeneghi also exhibited at the Salon d’Automne in 1904 and in Mulhouse in 1908 + 11. (iR1)

 

 

S1877-2183, A l’église
x

SdAF-1884-3236, Au café ; pastel
x

SdAF-1884-3237, Le matin ; pastel
x

 

 

 

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