Monet account

Claude Monet (1840-1926)

Account

of his exhibited works

 

 

 

Introduction:
On this page you will find an account of wich paintings Vlaude Monet has exhibited at the ‘impressionist’ expositions in 1874,  1876, 1877, 1879 and 1882. Also you will find the pictures he admitted at the Paris Salon, who were partly accepted and partly rejected. The indication of a painting is can be uncertain. Often there are more than one options. In my choices I mainly have followed the Catalogue Raisonnée of Wildenstein (1996=R22), Moffet (1986=R2), Dayez (1974=R87) and Berson 1996=R90II)  who often follow the earlier Catalogue Raisonné of Wildenstein (1974=R127). See at the bottom of the main page on Claude Monet for the used sources.

 

The first ‘impressionist’ exposition 1874:

General overview:

  • catalogue numbers 95 – 103
  • nrs. 99, 100, 101 contain two works
  • in total 12 works ;
    • 5 oil paintings (95-98, 103) and 7 pastels (99-102)
    • 2x an indication of place
    • 1x an indication of time, season or weather
    • 7x a study
    • 0x a loan
  • See for the suggestions of Dayez (1974=R87,p243), Moffett (1986=R2,p121), Berson (1996=R90II,p9+10+24). They refer to the older Catalogue Raisonné (=CR) of Wildenstein (1874-91=R127). I mainly use the newer Catalogue Raisonné (=CR) of Wildenstein, who uses the same numbers as the older one and uses additional with alphabetical letters (1996=R22; see online version on iR182).

The catalogue numbers (R2,p121;R90I,p6;iR1):

1IE-1874-95, Coquelicots;
Dayez, Moffett, Berson and Wildenstein suggest CR274. This work was bought by Durand-Ruel 1873/12 and later part of the Fauré collection (R22). Note: there was no lender mentioned in the catalogue.

1IE-1874-96, Le Havre, Bateaux de pêche sortant du port;
Dayez, Moffett, Berson and Wildenstein suggest CR296. Bought by Fauré 1874/09 (R22). Dayez suggests CR 126, an option Moffett also renders. This painting was rejected at the Salon of 1869. This work also was bought by Fauré (R22). It shows the old outer harbour of Le Havre, looking east-wards (R22).

1IE-1874-97, Boulevard des Capucines;
Moffett, Berson and Wildenstein suggest CR292. Bought by Fauré 1874/09. Dayez suggests CR293, 80×60, NAMA Kansas City, which Moffett and Berson also render this as an option.

1IE-1874-98, Impression, soleil levant;
Dayez, Moffett, Berson and Wildenstein suggest CR263. Also exhibited as 4IE-1879-146, Effet de brouillard, impression. This work is dated  on the canvas 1872, but according to Wildenstein it was painted in 1873. Hoschedé bought this work for 800 francs 1874/05; 1878/06/05-06 De Bellio bought it for 210 francs. It shows the old outer harbour of Le Havre, looking south-east (R22).

1IE-1874-99, Deux croquis (pastel)
1IE-1874-100, Deux croquis (pastel)
1IE-1874-101, Deux croquis (pastel)
1IE-1874-102, Un croquis (pastel)
Croquis = study. Wildenstein, Dayez, Berson and Moffett give no suggestions. There were no reviews (R90II,p74). The-athenaeum.org (iR2) shows 15 pastels of Monet made before 1874. I took 7 of them as a very uncertain suggestion of what Monet showed in 1874. Other options are: 1864-70 ca., The Seine estuary, 25×38, private; 1865-70 ca., Cat sleeping on a bed, 11×21, private; 1865-70 ca., Sainte-Adresse, view across the estuary, 22×28, private; 1865-70 ca., Three cows in a pasture, 32×50, private; 1866 ca., Open sea, 21×42, private; 1868, after the rain, 18×30, private; 1865-70 ca., Nightfall, 21×38, MBA Nantes; 1861 ca., Yport and the falaise d’Aval, 19×40, private.

1IE-1874-103, Déjeuner;
Dayez, Moffett, Berson and Wildenstein suggest CR132. Bought by Fromental in 1875 (R22). Note 1: this painting was rejected at the Salon of 1870. Note 2: Wildenstein wrongly mentions that the catalogue number was 95 (R22II,p63).

 

The second impressionist exposition of 1876:

General overview:

  • catalogue numbers 148-165
  • one work exhibited outside the catalogue (=hors catalogue = hc)
  • in total 18+1hc+19 works exhibited, all oil paintings
    • 9x indication of place (6x Argenteuil); see Argenteuil in Google maps
    • 3x indication of time, season or weather
    • 1x a study
    • 9 loans (appartient à…), 8 of Faure and 1 of Chocquet
  • See for the suggestions of Moffett (1986=R2,p162/3), Berson (1996=R90II,p40/1+56-59). They refer to the older Catalogue Raisonné (=CR) of Wildenstein (1874-91=R127). I mainly use the newer Catalogue Raisonné (=CR) of Wildenstein, who uses the same numbers as the older one and uses additional with alphabetical letters (1996=R22; see online version on iR182).

The catalogue numbers (R2,p163;R90I,p50;iR1):

2IE-1876-148, Le petit bras, Argenteuil ; appartient à M. Faure;
Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion, nor does Berson, who refers to the reviews of Bertall (2x) and E.F. (R90II,p40). Bertall reviews ‘M. Monet knows well that the trees are never of a yellow of sharp reeds like those in his petit bras d’Argenteuil no 148.’ (R90I,p58). E.F. mentions it ‘worth stopping for’, inmediately following with ‘but L’Effet d’automne…’ (=no.158) (R90I,p83). Wildenstein suggests CR290 with a ‘?’. Compare also 2IE-1876-158. Monet painted this theme of the small branche of the Seine near Ile Marante (disappeared in 1965) near Argenteuil, very often, see: CR196-200; CR229-232; CR290+291; CR426-429. Most of these paintings had other buyers around 1876, including Durand-Ruel, accept: CR230, 1872, Small boats at Argenteuil, 49×65, Orsay; CR232, 1872, The small branch of the Seine at Argenteuil, 51×66, private; CR426, 1876, Banks of the Seine, 55×76, private. There is not a work depicting this scene of which it is known that it belonged to Faure in 1876. The fact that E.F. combines no.148 and no.158 (probably CR291) and Bertall mentions ‘a yellow of sharp reeds’ makes CR290 a good option, as Wildenstein suggests. Before 1882 Oudard owned this work, but it is unclear since when (R22,CR290).

2IE-1876-149, La Seine à Argenteuil; appartient à M. Faure;
Wildenstein suggests in his list of expositions (IV, p1016) CR373 for 2IE-1876-149 or 2IE-1876-157. In his commend on CR373 he only suggests 2IE1876-149 without an ?. Moffett and Berson follow. Berson refers to the reviews of Porcheron and Blémont (R90II,p40). This painting was also shown at Monet’s solo exhibition in 1883 at Durand-Ruel no.13. Fauré bought this work 1875/09. Shows the Petit-Gennevilliers bank and the Seine Looking downstream; the end of the Argenteuil promenade can be seen on the right (R22II,p154). Monet painted this theme many times, see also 2IE-1876-157 and CR374+375.

2IE-1876-150, Le Chemin d’Epinay .
Wildenstein suggests two options: CR388 and 389; Moffett and Berson choose CR389. Berson especially refers to the colours mentioned in the Bertall reviews (R90II,p40): ‘He is convinced that le chemin d’Epinay effet de neige, no 150, has never appeared as a tapestry of white, blue and green wool.’ (R90I,p57+58). But CR388 has the same colour pattern. So I render both options. CR388 and CR389 are both options for no. 38 in the Hôtel Drouot sale 1876/04/14. It shows the entrance to Argenteuil on the towpath leading from Epinay; the Argenteuil railway bridge can be seen on the left through the mist. CR389 whows the towpath running from Argenteuil to Epinay, looing towards Epinay. (R22II,p160).

2IE-1876-151, La plage à Sainte-Adresse; appartient à M. Faure;
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR92. Faure bought the work 1873/02/28. In the summer of 1867 Monet lived in Sainte-Adresse with his aunt in Rue des Phares, see Google maps. The name of the villa is Le Coteau, the entrance is at 16, Rue Charles-Dalencourt. See also: 3IE-1877-110; 4IE-1879-155, 157.

2IE-1876-152,  Le pont du Chemin de fer, Argenteuil; appartient à M. Faure;
CR279, Wildenstein suggest CR279 with a ‘?’, Moffett with a ‘perhaps’; Berson follows. Probably bougth by Faure 1874/06. The scene was painted from the Argenteuil bank, not far from Monet’s home; Renoir painted a canvas at the same spot (R22). Monet painted the railway bridge more often: CR318-320. See the location on Google maps .

2IE-1876-153, Japonnerie;
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR387. Sold at Hôtel Drouot 1876/04/14 as no.37 for 2000 francs and later in 1877/04/19 as no.48. One of the few portraits Monet made; here Camille with a blonde wig.

2IE-1876-154, La prairie; appartient à M. Faure;
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR341. Bought back by Monet himself for 190 francs at the Hôtel Drouot sale 1875/03/24 (no.6). Around 1876 bought by Faure. (R22II,p142)

2IE-1876-155, Le petit Gennevilliers; appartient à M. Faure
Nor Wildenstein, nor Moffett, nor Berson give a suggestion for this painting. There were no reviews (R90II,p41). Monet has painted Le petit Gennevilliers, which lies opposite of Argenteuil on the right / east bank of the Seine, many times. My suggestion of CR368 also belonged to Faure around 1876; Wildenstein and Moffett give this painting as a second option for 3IE-1876-160. In this painting the Petit-Gennevilliers bank is on the left. Other options are CR225 (see 3IE-1877-165) and CR226, 233, 336-338, 370-375. For the location see google maps .

2IE-1876-156, Le pont d’Argenteuil ; appartient à M. Faure
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR311. Bought by Faure in 1874 (R22). This picture is part of a little serie containing CR311-316. Monet also showed this painting in 1886 at the exhibition of ‘les XX’ in Brussels as no.5. For the location see picture google maps .

2IE-1876-157, La berge d’Argenteuil ; appartient à M. Faure
La berge = Eng.: riverbank. Wildenstein suggests in his list of expositions (IV, p1016) CR373 for 2IE-1876-149 or 2IE-1876-157. In his commend on CR373 he only suggests 2IE1876-149 without an ?. Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion, nor does Berson, who refers to the reviews of Bertall (2x), who writes: ‘La Berge d’Argenteuil, no 157, it is sure, has never been knitted wool and cotton in five colours. This did not prevent him from making his so-called impression. The object appeared original to M. Faure, who made himself a new novelty by acquiring these impressions. The audience watched, laughed and asked for the name. He now knows that the gentleman who had the amazing idea of making the knitted landscapes is called Monet, and Mr. Monet is about to become as famous as Mr. Manet.’ (R90I,p57+58).
Monet has painted this theme very often: CR374 and 375 are variations of CR373. My suggestion CR225 is part of a little serie (CR221-225), mostly bought by Durand-Ruel; CR225 was at some day the property of Duez, but Wildenstein doesn’t give a date; so maybe at some time it was part of the Faure collection; my suggestion stays uncertain. Wildenstein describes that this work was made at the opposite bank than CR373: ‘This painting depicts the promenade at Argenteuil looking upstream, with the road bridge in the background. (R22II,p100).

2IE-1876-158, Effet d’automne; appartient à M. Choquet
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR291 with a ‘?’ ‘perhaps’. Probably bought by Chocquet 1876/02/05 for 100 francs (R22). Compare also no. 148.

2IE-1876-159, Les dahlias .
Wildenstein doesn’t give a suggestion; Moffett gives CR383 with a perhaps, Berson follows, I follow to. Blémont (1876/04/11) reviews ‘We less like “Jardin aux dahlias”. The fig trees are too rough, the reflections too violently.’ (R90I,p63). I can’t discern fig trees in CR383. As another uncertain suggestion I render CR286 of which the second title is ‘The dahlias’; it is related to CR285 which was exhibited as no.162. CR383 was bought by Hoschedé 1877/03. and sold at Hôtel Drouot 1878/06/05 for 62 francs to Chocquet (R22). Renoir painted a similar work as CR286, see R31,no23.

2IE-1876-160, Les bateaux d’Argenteuil ; appartient à M. Faure
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR368 or 369. I render here CR369 and have CR368 used as suggestion for 2IE-1876-155.

2IE-1876-161, La promenade .
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR381. Monet depicted Camille and Jean in this picture. It was bought by De Bellio 1876/11/17 (R22).

2IE-1876-162, Paneau décoratif .
(=Eng. decorative panel). Note: the title is very general. Still Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson are sure about CR285 as indication for this painting. Rivière / Pieerre Dax (1876/05/01) refers to a ‘lunch in the countryside’, which according to Berson refers to no.162 (R90I,p70). Monet painted it in the garden of his first house in Argenteuil with Jean in front on the left side. This painting was part of the Gustave Caillebotte inheritance.

2IE-1876-163, Le printemps .
Wildenstein suggests CR201, now in the Union League Club in Chicago; Berson follows; Moffett adds CR205 as other possibility but also reserves this painting as suggestion for 2IE-1876-165+hc. Berson refers to reviews of Bigot, Baignères and Rivière (R90II,p41).

2IE-1876-164, Les bains de la Grenouillère .
Wildenstein suggests only CR136 with a ?; this painting has been destroyed during World War II. The CR135 I render to compare has the greatest resemblance with this painting. Moffett also suggests CR134 as option and Berson follows; this work was part of the Manet collection. Later on we will show more on La Grenouillère .

2IE-1876-165, Bateaux de pêche (étude)
Nor Wildenstein, nor Moffett, nor Berson give a suggestion. There were no reviews (R90II,p41). My first suggestion CR165 is uncertain; it had been in the Duranty collection, but Wildenstein doesn’t indicate since when (R22). As a second uncertain suggestion I render CR227. This number is part of a small serie CR226-CR232. They depict sailing boats in the harbour of Argenteuil / Petit-Gennevilliers, used for recreational boating and not for fishing. CR338 also is an option depicting the same harbour scene.

2IE-76-165+hc, Springtime .
Wildenstein mentions this painting CR205 as being part of the second impressionist exposition but being outside the catalogue (hc = hors catalogue). He refers to the review of Zola (1876) ‘the portrait of a woman dressed in white, sitting in the shade of the foliage, her dress strewn with luminous spangles, like large drops.’ (R90I,p113). Moffett also gives this painting as option for 2IE-1876-163. There is discussion whether the woman painted is Camille. The painting was bought by Durand-Ruel 1872/11/23, sold to Hoschedé 1873/04/28 and auctioned at Hôtel Drouot 1878/06/05 (R22).

 

The third impressionist exposition of 1877:

General overview:

  • catalogue numbers 90-119
  • one work exhibited outside the catalogue (=hors catalogue = hc)
  • in total 30+1hc=31 works exhibited, all oil paintings
    • 20x indication of place (8x Gare Saint-Lazare; 3x Montgeron; 3x Tuilleries)
      Note: the following works were made in Montgeron: no. 91, 92, 93, 99, 101, 108, 112.
    • 2x indication of time, season or weather
    • 2x a study
    • 20 loans (appartient à…), 11 probably of Hoschedé
  • See for the suggestions of Moffett (1986=R2,p205), Berson (1996=R90II,p75-78+93-96). They refer to the older Catalogue Raisonné (=CR) of Wildenstein (1874-91=R127). I mainly use the newer Catalogue Raisonné (=CR) of Wildenstein, who uses the same numbers as the older one and uses additional with alphabetical letters (1996=R22; see online version on iR182).

The catalogue numbers (R2,p205;R90I,p119;iR1):

3IE-1877-90, La prairie, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé?)
Nor Wildenstein, nor Moffett, nor Berson give a suggestion. Berson refers to reviews of A.P. and La Petite République française (R90II,p75), both just mention the title (R90I,p173+176). The theme of the title links to the next options: CR274 (=1IE-1874-95), CR275, CR276, CR341 (=2IE-1876-154), CR341a, CR376-380. Just to give an impression I render CR378. It represents the plain of Colombes or Gennevilliers. Du Fresnay bought it from Monet in 1878. (R22)

3IE-1877-91, La mare à Montgeron, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR419, that belonged to Hoschedé. Moffett renders it with a perhaps. Berson refers to reviews of A.P. (who just mentions the title) and Rivière (R90II,p75). Rivière (1877/04/06) writes of ‘the banks of the lake with the deep, dark blue water in which the tall trees are reflected.’ (R90I,p181). CR419 is a study for CR420, which is now in the Hermitage; I wonder why Monet didn’t show this larger one. According to Kosthenevich Monet did (R15,p170). CR420 was commissioned for by Hoschedé, but it is unclear if he bought it. Though 2 works exhibited in 1877 have in the title an indication that it was a study, this title hasn’t. The ‘dark, blue water’ from the review of Rivière, applies a bit more to CR419. CR420 is a quite large canvas (174x194cm); I assume if it was exhibited, this was mentioned and more art-critics would have given a review. So I render the smaller study, CR419, as ‘probably’ exhibited. The painting shows the pond at the Hoschedé estate of Château de Rottembourg at Montgeron, see Google maps. In the 1877 exposition Monet shows 11 paintings belonging to Hoschedé  (3IE-1877-90?, 91, 92, 93, 97, 99, 100, 101, 108, 109, 112). Most of them are painted in and around Château de Rottembourg (3IE-1877-91, 92, 93, 99, 101, 108, 109, 112).

3IE-1877-92, Paysage d’automne, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR432, which belonged to Hoschedé. I render a black and white reproduction and also give to compare CR433, which is now in the Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature in Hôtel Guénégaud in Paris; it was also painted in Montgeron; it was a commission given by Hoschedé (R22). Compare also no.108.

3IE-1877-93, Les Dahlias (Montgeron), appartient à M H… (=Hoschedé)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR417, which belonged to Hoschedé. (See also info no.91.) CR417 was a study for CR418, exhibited as no.112. Strangely the title depicts rose bushes, but maybe the white/yellow flowers of the left bush are dahlias. Other paintings render explicitely dahlias, like CR383 (also belonged to Hoschedé) or CR286 and in that sense are more appropriate; see also 2IE-1876-159; but these paintings were not made in Montgeron. Berson refers to reviews of Rivière, Jacques and Chevalier (R90II,p75). Chevalier (1877/05/01) reviews ‘Les Dahlias that the same artist brings back from Montgeron, remain very harmonious in their gleaming colouring. They stand out in the light from the shadow of a clump of trees whose dense foliage darkens the edge of a pond. ‘ (R90I,p139). Rivière (1877/04/06) writes of ‘ the corner of a lake with dahlias’ (R90I,p181). Jacques only mentions the title (R90I,p155). I go along with the suggeston of CR417 but render it as ‘probably’ exhibited.

3IE-1877-94, Dans la prairie, appartient à M. Duret
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR405. Painted in a meadow near Argenteuil. Bought by Duret 1877ca. (R22) Compare no.90 and 2IE-1876-154.

3IE-1877-95, Les Tuileries, appartient à M. de Bellio
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR401. Bought by De Bellio 1876/06. Monet painted from the apartment of Victor Chocquet, 198, Rue de Rivoli, Paris, see Google-maps. See the same theme in no.105 and 119. This work was also exhibited as no.1 at the solo exhibition in 1883 and as no.527 at the Exposition Centennale in 1889 (R22,CR401).

3IE-1877-96, Paysage, le parc Monceaux, appartient à M. de Bellio
Wildenstein, Moffett and Breson suggest CR398. It was bought by De Bellio 1876/06/25. Monceaux in mostly spelled as Monceau, see parc Monceau on Google-maps. See the same theme in 4IE-1879-152.

3IE-1877-97, Arrivée du train de Normandie, gare St-Lazare, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé)
See below.

3IE-1877-98, Le pont de Rome, gare St-Lazare, appartient à M. de Bellio
See below.

3IE-1877-99, Portrait d’enfant, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR434 See info no.91.

3IE-1877-100, La gare St-Lazare, arrivée d’un train, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé)
See below.

3IE-1877-101, Les dindons (décoration non terminée), appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR416. At the background of this painting you see Château Rottembourg. (see info no.91). Rivière (1877/04/06) writes of ‘the garden of the country-house’ (R90I,p181).

3IE-1877-102, Vue intérieure de la gare St.-Lazare .
See below.

3IE-1877-103, La maison du passeur à Argenteuil, appartient à M. Manet (=Edouard Manet)
Wildenstein, Moffett (with a perhaps) and Berson suggest CR329, which has been destroyed 1950ca. It shows a sailing boat, without sail, in the front; to the right bushes; and in the background the ferryman’s house (=la maison du passeur). Manet had purchaised it 1877ca. (R22) I render a black and white copy. To compare I choose for CR325 because there are several resemblances with the CR329 painting.

3IE-1877-104, Marine (Argenteuil), appartient à M. Manet (=Gustave Manet)
Wildenstein doesn’t give a suggestion; Moffett mentions with a perhaps CR327; Berson repeats Moffett his suggestion, but leaves it unidentified. She refers to reviews of Jacques and Chevalier. She refers also to reviews of C.D and Descubes, which might also refer to no.110. Chevalier (1877/05/01) reviews ‘A view of the Seine, near Argenteuil, by M. Monet, is painted frankly in a sober and accurate tone.’ (R90I,p139). Jacques (1877/04/11) just calls it ‘remarkable’ (R90I,p155). C.D. (1877/04/08) calls it a ‘a little wonder’ (R90I,p142). Descubes (1877/04/20) calls it ‘a fine seascape’ (R90I,p143). CR327 was 1876/04 handed to Gustave Manet as guarantee for a loan and later probably sold to Faure. Argenteuil can be seen in the background. (R22).

3IE-1877-105, Les Tuileries ; esquisee
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR403. Dated 1875, but according to Wildenstein painted in 1876. Bought by Caillebotte 1877/05. (R22) See info no.95.

3IE-1877-106, Corbeille des fleurs, appartient à M. Charpentier
Eng.: Basket of flowers. Nor Wildenstein, nor Moffett and Berson give a suggestion. Berson refers to reviews of Bernadille, Jacques and Sébillot (R90II,p77), but they all merely mention the title (R90I). Looking in the Catalogue Raisonné of Wildenstein the only still lives with flowers until 1877 are: CR20+139 (the last exhibited probably as 4IE-1879-142), but both are not in a basket. Looking at later paintings I think CR492a (a later painting dated 1878) can give a good impression of what Monet exhibited in 1877. This work was purchased by Moïse Dreyfus. A similar picture, CR492, was bought by Dr. Gachet.

3IE-1877-107, La plaine de Gennevilliers,
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR437. Berson refers to reviews of A.P., C.D., La Petite République française and Descubes (R90II,p77). Later on bought by Caillebotte. The Cormeilles and Sannois hills can be seen in the background. (R22) Gennevilliers lies opposite to Argenteuil on the left bank of the Seine, see Google-maps.

3IE-1877-108, Effet d’automne à Montgeron, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé)
Wildenstein suggests CR431, Berson follows; Moffett follows with a perhaps. Compare no.92; see info no.91.

3IE-1877-109, Le Châlet, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé ?)
Wildenstein suggests CR422, but he doesn’t affirm the painting belonged to Hoschedé.  Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion, nor does Berson, who refers to the review of Sébillot, who only mentions the title (R90I,p190). A ‘Châlet’ is a (Swiss) wooden house. But this painting shows a stone house / villa. The house at Yerres is still there at 37, Avenue de l’Abbeye, Yerres, see Google-maps. Yerres is 3km from Montgeron. Note: in those days Caillebotte had a family estate in Yerres. I will render CR422 with a ‘maybe’ exhibited. 

3IE-1877-110, Marine (St-Adresse), appartient à M. Duret
Wildenstein suggests CR94. Berson follows. Moffett follows with a perhaps. Berson refers to reviews of Bernadille, Fillonneau, A.P. and La Petite République française (R90II,p77). All more mention the work, than describe it. Bought by Duret 1873/05. Also exhibited at La Vie Moderne in 1880 as no.15. (R22) The museum in Geneva renders a video (French spoken).
When we look at other Marines in the same period (CR71, 72, 86, 112, 113) Monet paints (mainly) only the sea; this is not so with CR94. Note: the brightness of the colours and the vivid brushstrokes of this early work of the summer of 1867. There is much likeness with the older works CR758 (1882, walk on the cliff at Pourville) and CR805 (1882, the fisherman’s house at Varengeville). See main page about Monet. Other pictures made in Sainte-Adresse are exhibited as: 2IE-1876-151 and 4IE-1879-155+157; they are colourfull, but painted much smoother.

3IE-1877-111, Le grand quai au Hâvre (esquisse), appartient à M. Fromenthal
Esquisse = study. Wildenstein suggests CR295, Moffett and Berson follow. There were no reviews (R90II,p77). Bought by Fromenthal 1875/01. On the left the landing stage for the Le Havre-Caen line. Location: see Quai Joannes Couvert in Le Havre .

3IE-1877-112, Un jardin, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé?)
Wildenstein suggests CR418 with an ?; Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion, nor does Berson, who refers to the reviews of A.P. (who names it ‘Coin de jardin’; R90I,p173) and in L’Évenement. Kostenevich also suggests (with some doubt) that this work was exhibited (R15,p174). Compare no.93, the suggested CR417 was a study for CR418; see also info no.91. CR418 was commissioned for by Hoschedé, just like CR416 420 and 433. (R22;R15,p168-174) Rivière (1877/04/06) writes of ‘the garden of the country-house’ (R90I,p181), but CR418 doesn’t render a countryhouse, or does this review refer to no. 101? A.P. mentions a ‘coin de jardin’ (R90I,p173). L’Évenement (1877/04/06) describes ‘a garden where all is violet’ (R90I,p145) Both also could apply to no. 113.

3IE-1877-113, Un jardin .
Nor Wildenstein, nor Moffett, nor Berson give a suggestion. Rivière (1877/04/06) writes of ‘the garden of the country-house’ (R90I,p181), but this also could apply to no.101 or 112. A.P. mentions a ‘coin de jardin’ (R90I,p173). L’Évenement (1877/04/06) describes ‘a garden where all is violet’ (R90I,p145) Both also could apply to no. 112. The ‘all violet garden’ maybe refers to CR203, which was purchased by Durand-Ruel 1873/02 and sold at Hôtel Drouot 1876/05/27. Or to CR204 which was purchased by Durand-Ruel 1873/02 and sold before 1877 to an unknown person. (R22) I render them both as uncertain suggesions. Compare also CR201, exhibited as 2IE-1876-163 and CR205, exhibited as 2IE-1876-hc.

3IE-1877-114, portrait .
Moffett suggests CR436, Berson follows, Wildenstein does the same but with a ‘?’. There were no reviews (R90II,p77). In Monet’s house in Giverny one can see a copy of this painting. I make a second suggestion: CR366; it is less a portrait, but it combines better with no.115. See also Renoir’s portrait of Monet on the same spot (see). CR366 was sold at the Hôtel Drouot auction 1875/03/24 for 290 francs to Debrousse.

3IE-1877-115, Intérieur d’appartement, appartient à M. G.C. (= Gustave Caillebotte)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR365. There were several reviews (R90II,p77). Jean and Camille are seen in the background. Bought back by Monet at the Hôtel Drouot auction sale 1875/03/23 for 325 francs. In 1876 sold to Caillebotte. This painting was also exhibited in 1887 at Georges Petit. (R22) Compare no.114.

3IE-1877-116, Intérieur de la gare St-Lazare, à Paris,
3IE-1877-117, Intérieur de la gare St-Lazare, à Paris .
3IE-1877-118, Intérieur de la gare St-Lazare, à Paris .
See below.

3IE-1877-119, Le Jardin des Tuilleries .
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR402. See also no.95 and 105. Renoir painted the same motive (R22).

3IE-1877-119+hc, La gare Saint-Lazare à l’exterieur .
See below.

La gare Saint-Lazare:
See location on  Google-maps .
Introduction: Wildenstein shows in his catalogue raisonnée a serie of 12 paintings with Le Gare Saint-Lazare as theme (CR438-449). From the last picture, CR449, an exterior, there is only a picture known in a document, not the painting itself. At the third impressionist exposition Monet showed 7 paintings of this serie (no.97, 98, 100, 102, 116, 117, 118); according to Moffett and Berson also one hc (=outside the catalogue), which makes 8. Wildenstein shows 8 exterieurs and 4 interiors. The catalogue mentions 4 interiors (102, 116, 117, 118). But Wildenstein and Moffett don’t only  choose for no.102 an interior, but also for no.97 and 100, this leaves one more interior (CR441). Maybe CR444 Exterior of Saint-Lazare station, arrival of a train (see no.116) is een option for no.97. The 1877 catalogue mentions that no.116, 117 and 118 are alle interiors of the Gare Saint-Lazare. Wildenstein solves this problem by suggesting three exteriors (CR444, 447 and 448). Moffett suggests CR438 as possibility for no.102, 116, 117 and 118. For the hc Moffett suggests CR448 (see no.118); as another suggestion I give CR443. Three works belonged to Gustave Caillebotte at that time (CR438 (intérieur) and CR447 and CR448 (two extérieurs). Nr. 115 (Intérieur d’appartement) belonged to Caillebotte. Is it possible nrs. 116-118 also belonged to him, but there was no room in the catalogue? Is it possible there were writing errors between interiors and exteriors?
Let us look at the reviews. Descubes mentions Monet exhibited 6 works of La gare Saint-Lazare (see no.116-118); note the catalogue mentions 7 paintings. Bigot mentions 7 or 8 of the in total 29 paintings (see no.97); note: 29 is 2 less than the 30+1hc Monet exhibited; but Fillonneau also mentions that Monet exhibited 29 works (see no.97). De Lora mentions 5 or 6 interiors (see no.98); note: the catalogue mentions 4 interiors. Bernadille mentions Monet depicted this theme 7 times (see no.100).
Let us look at the detailed review of Rivière (1877/04/06; R90I,p180/1):
‘This year, M. Monet gives us several paintings representing locomotives alone or attached to a ribbon of wagons in the Gare St.-Lazare. These paintings are surprisingly varied, despite the monotony and dryness of the subject. Here, more than anywhere else perhaps, is shown the science of arrangement, of design in the canvas, which is one of the master qualities of M. Monet.’ Not referring to a specific painting.
‘In one of the largest paintings, the train has just arrived, the locomotive is about to depart. Like an unbiased and feisty beast, animated rather than tired from the long milking it has just given, it shakes its mane of smoke against the glass roof of the great hall. Around the monster, men swarm on the track, like pygmies at the foot of a giant. On the other side, resting locomotives are waiting for sleep. And in the background, the grey sky, draping the tall pale houses, closes the horizon. One hears the shouts of the employees, the high-pitched whistles of the machines sounding their alarm calls in the distance, the incessant clattering of iron and the heavy, panting breathing of the steam.’ Berson connects this to no. 100, but Rivière doesn’t. It seems to refer to CR439. But the description ‘On the other side, resting locomotives…’ and ‘swarming people’ better refers to CR440 or CR441.
‘We see the grandiose, panic-stricken movement of a station whose ground shakes with every turn of the wheels. The pavements are wet with soot, and the atmosphere is charged with the pungent smell of burning coal. Looking at this magnificent painting, one is seized with the same emotion as in front of nature, and this emotion is perhaps even stronger, because in the painting there is the artist’s emotion as well.’ It is unclear if Rivière now describes another painting, but the ‘wet pavements’ seems to refer more to CR440. Still, his ‘Near this painting, another of the same size…’ implies he still was describing CR439, which has about the same larger size as CR438.
‘Near this painting, another of the same size depicts the arrival of a train under a bright sun. It is a cheerful and lively painting, with people hurrying down from the carriages, the smoke flees to the bottom to rise higher, and the sun gilds the sand of the track and the machinery as it passes (seen) through the windows.’ Berson connects this review to no.102, but Rivière doesn’t explicitely. It seems to describe CR438, which has about the same size as CR440. Only CR443 depicts also a ‘bright sun’, but the description doesn’t fit well, plus it is smaller than CR439.
‘In some pictures, the fast trains are irresistible, wrapped in the light rings of smoke, rushing into the departing platform.’ Berson doesn’t make a connection. CR445 and CR449 are options. Note: this doesn’t relate to any of the titles in the 1877 catalogue. CR445 was bought by Hoschedé Marz 1877, so this would be mentioned. So I suggest that CR449 also was exhibited, but outside the catalogue (=hc).
‘In others, the large and scattered locomotives are waiting to leave.’ Berson doesn’t make a connection. CR446 is an option and also CR441 and CR442, these last 2 are the options for no.117+98.
‘In all of them, the same power animating these objects, which M. Monet alone has been able to render.’
Let us also look at Rivière his later review (1877/11/01; R90I,p187):
‘One of his paintings depicts the arrival of a train under the rue de Rome bridge.’ Berson connects this to no.98 / CR442.
‘Another shows us a locomotive heating up for departure, the air is charged with steam, other emissions released by the burning coal.’ It could refer to CR446, but also to CR444, CR442 (=no.98) and CR439 (=no.97 or 100).
‘Another picture contains only discs, the train has just passed and the smoke swirls on the track in big clouds; this picture is not the least interesting.’ Berson connects this to the work exhibited ‘hors catalogue’ (=CR448; see3IE-1877-119+hc).

3IE-1877-97, Arrivée du train de Normandie, gare St-Lazare, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR440. Explicitly mentioned, but not described in the review of Bigot (1877/04/28): ‘Of his 29 paintings, seven or eight are devoted to showing us all aspects of the Saint-Lazare station. These various studies are certainly not without interest, and there is one which seems to me to be excellent: This is the one displayed at the bottom, closest to the window, and depicts an interior of the station. The number is missing on the frame, but I am assured that it is no. 97…’ (R90I,p134) Fillonneau (1877/04/20) only mentions the title and that Monet exhibited 29 works (R90I,p146). A.P. (1877/04/07) sums up ‘la Gare Saint-Lazare’ and later ‘l’Arrivée du train de Normandie’, but doesn’t describe them (R90I,p173). La Petite République française (1877/04/10) reviews: ‘several Intérieurs de gare, notebly l’Arrivée du train de Normandie, one of the beste choices of the exposition (R90I,p176). Conclusion: no.97 is mentioned explicitly 3x, but not described. The description of Rivière (see above) of probably CR440, doesn’t relate explicitly to this number. I think CR440 is a better option for no.100. Hoschedé also owned CR445, but according to Wildenstein this shows a departure. Hoschedé also had bought CR439 from Monet in Marz 1877, but it was ment for Charles Deudon. So maybe this one was exhibited as no.97.

3IE-1877-98, Le pont de Rome, gare St-Lazare, appartient à M. de Bellio
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR442. Explicitly mentioned in the review of Léon de Lora (1877/04/10) ‘He gives us five or six interior views of the Saint-Lazare station, filled with black, pink, grey and purple smoke, which make them an inexpressible and unreadable writing. Le Pont de Rome, from which passers-by watch the trains come and go, is not without merit, but it is quite unpleasant.’ (R90I,p162). Rivière (1877/11/01): ‘One of his paintings depicts the arrival of a train under the rue de Rome bridge.’  (R90I,p187). CR446 and CR447 also depict Le pont de Rome. CR446 better depicts the description ‘passers-by watching the trains’. But CR442 was bought by De Bellio 1877/03 and CR446+447 were (probably) not in his possesson (R22), so CR442 is the best option.

3IE-1877-100, La gare St-Lazare, arrivée d’un train, appartient à M. H… (=Hoschedé)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR439. Explicitly mentioned in the review of Bernadille (1877/04/13): ‘M. Monet alone has painted the Gare Saint-Lazare seven times; stations are, along with steps and streets, one of the Impressionists’ favourite objects. The canvas that represents l’Arrivée d’un train under the number 100 is very nice: it is crowded.’ (R90I,p130). CR440+441 are more ‘crowded’ than CR439. CR446 also depicts an arrival and also is rather crowdy. Compare the ‘swarming people’ in the Rivière review (see above). CR439, 440 and 445 were part of the Hoschedé collection, but Hoschedé bought CR439 from Monet in Marz 1877 for Charles Deudon (R22); so was CR439 still in his possession during the exposition held in April? I think CR440 is the best option for no.100.

3IE-1877-102, Vue intérieure de la gare St.-Lazare .
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR438. Explicitly mentioned in the review of Bernadille (1877/04/13): ‘But the Vue intérieure catalogued 102 deserves the award for the exhibition. It is a wonderful realisation of the story of this ancient painter, Protogenes or Apelles, who, unable to represent the scum of a dog, he hurriedly threw his brush against the canvas and succeeded by chance in doing what he had been unable to do by dint of hard work. (…) M. Monet has the glory of having summed up and symbolised the whole school in this painting, which represents who knows what, with who knows what colours beaten and blurred who knows how.’ (R90I,p130), see also no.100. Georges Lafenestre reviews in Le Monteur universel (1877/04/08; also partly printed in La Petite Presse (1877/04/09): ‘The first canvas that attracts attention of the public penatrating in the salon of the impressionists, is a Vue intérieure de la gare Saint Lazare de M. Claude Monet. The artist wanted to cause the impression produced on travellers by the noise of the machines at arrival or departure times. He made a very nice geographical map where one can distinguish a locomotive in the middle. The green, pink, purple and white divisions form an attractive colour scheme.’  (R90I,p169). I think CR438 is a good option. It was bought in 1878 by Caillebotte (R22).

3IE-1877-116, Intérieur de la gare St-Lazare, à Paris,
3IE-1877-117, Intérieur de la gare St-Lazare, à Paris .
3IE-1877-118, Intérieur de la gare St-Lazare, à Paris .
Wildenstein suggest CR 444, 447 and 448. The problem is that these are all extériors in stead of intériors as the catalogue indicates. Moffett suggests CR438 (an intérior), which he also suggests for no.102. Chevalier (1877/05/01) reviews ‘Note the Saint-Lazare station bearing the number 117, as well as another unnumbered canvas with a threatening and fierce disc dominating the foreground. In spite of the heavy vapours which invade them…’ (R90I,p139).
The 1877 catalogue mentions 4 interiors (no.102,116,117,118). The Catalogue Raisonné of Wildenstein only depicts 4 interiors. But two works, in the 1877 catalogue described as ‘arrivals’ and owned by Hoschedé (no.97+100), probably were 2 of these 4 interiors, namely CR439 and CR440. No.102 is probably CR438. Leaves CR441 as an option for no.116-118. As no.117 surely was exhibited I link it to this number. Berson suggests no.116+118 were not exhibited, because Descubes (1877/04/20) mentions that Monet exhibited 6 gare Saint-Lazare paintings (R90I,p144) and because of the accuracy of the critical citations (R90II,p76). I don’t agree with her on that accuracy, many reviews don’t clearly describe the paintings and certainly not related to the catalogue numbers or titles. Other art-critics don’t agree with Descubes. Bernadille mentions Monet depicted this theme 7x, Bigot 7 or 8x, De Lora 5 or 6 Interiors. Leaves us with 3 options: 1. 116+118 were not exhibited as Berson suggests; 2. there were 2 more interiors exhibited, but these are now lost; 3. it was a writting error, it should have been ‘Extérieur’. Anyway, Rivière also seems to describe CR449 and maybe also CR446 (see above). So either these works were also exhibited outside the catalogue (=hc) or they are options for the numbers 116+118 mistakingly written as ‘Intérieurs’.

3IE-1877-119+hc, La gare Saint-Lazare à l’exterieur .
Moffett (R2,pp205) suggests a work shown hc (=outside the catalogue) and he suggests CR448 for it; Berson follows. Wildenstein doesn’t follow and reserves CR448 as option for no.116, 117 or 118. I suggest another exterieur CR443. (see info 1877-97). Chevalier (1877/05/01) reviews ‘Note the Saint-Lazare station bearing the number 117, as well as another unnumbered canvas with a threatening and fierce disc dominating the foreground. In spite of the heavy vapours which invade them…’ (R90I,p139). Rivière (1877/11/01): ”Another picture contains only discs, the train has just passed and the smoke swirls on the track in big clouds; this picture is not the least interesting.’ (R90I,p187)

 

The fourth impressionist exposition of 1879:

General overview:

  • catalogue numbers 138-166
  • 3 works were exhibited outside the catalogue (=hors catalogue = hc)
  • in total 29+3hc=32 works exhibited, all oil paintings
    • 20x indication of place (9x Vétheuil and Lavacourt)
    • 6x indication of time, season or weather
    • 1x a study
    • 21 loans (appartient à…), 6 of de Bellio and 3 of Duret
  • See for the suggestions of Moffett / Pickvance (1986=R2,p269), Berson (1996=R90II,p114-117+132-137). They refer to the older Catalogue Raisonné (=CR) of Wildenstein (1874-91=R127). I mainly use the newer Catalogue Raisonné (=CR) of Wildenstein, who uses the same numbers as the older one and uses additional with alphabetical letters (1996=R22; see online version on iR182).

The catalogue numbers (R2,p269;R90I,p206;iR1):

4IE-1879-138, Habitation bourgeoise, à Zaandam (Hollande), appartient à M. Baudry
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR184. There were no reviews (R90II,p114). This painting is one of the paintings Monet made in Zaandam during his stay in 1871, see CR170-191a. See the Hogendijk in Zaandam at Google-maps

4IE-1879-139, Paysage à Courbevoie, appartient à M. Duret
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR457. Berson refers to reviews of Draner, Fournel, de la Leude and E.R. (R90II,p114). Fournel (1879/05/25) reviews ‘It is a bad joke of M. Monet’s to take about a quarter or a fifth of a tree, to paint this piece of trunk on a canvas, with three branches at the end of which one sees a dozen leaves, and to write underneath: Landscape at Courbevoie.’ (R90I,p221). CR457 was painted on the Île de la Grande Jatte; the Courbevoie bank can be seen across the water (R22). See also 4IE-1879-153. See Île de la Grande Jatte at Google-maps ; see Courbevoie at Google-maps

4IE-1879-140, Marine (1875), appartient à M. Duret
Wildenstein doesn’t give a suggestion. Moffett / Pickvance suggests CR73 and Berson follows. This work is (according to Wildenstein) a picture from 1866, but it was dated on the canvas 1865. According to Wildenstein it wasn’t purchased by Duret, but in 1873 Durand-Ruel bought it from Oudard (R22II,p40). Berson refers to reviews of Silvestre (2x), de Tarade (R90II,p124). Silvestre (1879/04/16) reviews ‘I cite his Barques de pêcheurs (no 141; sic), a very nice seascape executed in a summary manner; (R90I,p239). And later (1879/04/24) ‘I  mainwhile cite again his Barque de pècheurs sur une grosse mer (no 140) and, here again, he proceeds directly from Manet. (R90I,p240). De Tarade (1879/04/27) reviews ‘We cite again his Barques de pêcheurs (no 141; sic);’ (R90I,p144). These reviews don’t contradict the suggestion for CR73, but don’t clearly affirm it either. Wildenstein doesn’t give a Marine that was painted in 1875. In 1874 Monet painted two Marines in Amsterdam, CR298, 299, but they were not purchased by Duret. In 1882 Monet showed also two Marines (6IE-1882-60+74) and in 1877 also two (3IE-1877-104+110). The last one, a painting from 1867 also belonged to Duret. So it stays unclear. It could well be that the ‘1875’ (which was quite recent) was a writing error for 1865 and than CR73 is a good option, so I follow Moffett / Pickvance and Berson.

4IE-1879-141, Vétheuil, vu de Lavacourt, appartient à M. Duret
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR528. There is only a review of E.R. (R90II,p114). CR528 shows the southern part of Vétheuil, and the Chênay hill (R22). Monet lived from 1878 – 1881 in Vétheuil in what now is 14, Avenue Claude Monet; the house is now a hotel and Bed & Breakfast, see. Lavacourt is at the opposite left bank of the Seine. See also no.144, 148, 151, 156, 166.

4IE-1879-142, Fleurs, appartient à M.R. (=Rouart)
Wildenstein (‘?’), Moffett (‘perhaps’) and Berson suggest CR139. This work was not reviewed (R90II,p124). Painted in Bougival summer or autumn 1869. 1878/12 bought by Rouart. (R22) It was not in the Rouart sale of 1912 (R45). Compare a similar Renoir picture (now in MFM Boston). (R22)

4IE-1879-143, Pommiers, appartient à M.C. (=Gustave Caillebotte)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR490; painted at the foot of the Chantemesle hills; the church of Vétheuil can be seen in the background (R22). Berson refers to the reviews of E.R. and de Syène (R90II,p115).

4IE-1879-144, Effet de neige à Vétheuil, appartient à M.C. (=Gustave Caillebotte)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR506. Berson explicitly refers to the review of Fournel (R90II,p115). See info no.141.

4IE-1879-145, La rue Montorgueil, fête du 30 juin, appartient à M. de Bellio
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR469. There were several reviews (R90II,p115). Bought by De Bellio 1878/07. See also no.154. Location (about): 61, Rue Montorgeuil, Paris  .

4IE-1879-146, Effet de brouillard, impression, appartient à M. de Bellio
Wildenstein suggests the famous CR263, see also 1IE-1874-98; Berson follows; Moffett follows with a perhaps. De Bellio bought this work from the Hoschedé sale 1878/06/05 for 210 francs (R22). Berson refers to reviews of Nazim, E.R. and X. (R90II,p115).

4IE-1879-147, Estacade de Trouville, marée basse, appartient à M. Duez
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR154. Berson refers to the reveiws of Leroy, de Syène and de Tarade (R90II,p115). This work was exhibited in London at the 1st Annual exhibition of the Society of French artists, organised by Durand-Ruel in 1870 as no.36. The work shows the mouth of the Touques river between Deauville and Trouville, which lies south of Le Havre, see Google-maps (R22).

4IE-1879-148, Paysage de Vétheuil .
Nor Wildenstein, Moffett nor Berson give a suggestion. There were no reviews (R90II,p115). My uncertain suggestion is CR526. See info no.141.

4IE-1879-149, Lavacourt .
Wildenstein doesn’t give a suggestion; Moffett / Pickvance gives CR475 with a perhaps; Berson follows. Berson refers to several reviews (R90II,p115). Wildenstein writes that this work was probably purchased by Charles Deudon 1878/02 (R22). In that case it was likely, that he was mentioned in the catalogue as the lender. Lavacourt lies on the other (left) bank of the Seine, opposite too Vétheuil where Monet lived. Location: see  on Google-maps. Other paintings of Lavacourt: no.150, 161, 162.

4IE-1879-150, La Seine à Lavacourt, (soleil couchant) .
Wildenstein doesn’t give a suggestion; Moffett / Pickvance gives with a perhaps CR538; Berson follows. Berson refers to reviews of Montjoyeux, Silvestre and de Tarade (R90II,p115). Montjoyeux (1879/04/18) reviews probably referring to this work that he titles Ilots sur la Seine: ‘His small islands in the Seine are marvels of lightness and transparency.’ (R90I,p233). Silvestre (1877/04/24) reviews ‘The declining sun (no. 150) was, in fact, foreseen, and gives no new indication.’ (R90I,p240). J. de Tarade (1879/04/27) reviews ‘the numbers 150 and 161, which, though incomplete, are of a very accurate impression.’ (R90I,p244). As an option I also render CR538a, which is an study for CR538; maybe this comes closer to the ‘imcomplete’ in the J. de Tarade review. Compare also 7IE-1882-62. See info no.149.

4IE-1879-151, Vétheuil .
Nor Wildenstein, nor Moffett, nor Berson give a suggestion. Silvestre (1879/04/16) calls it ‘Village au bord de l’eau (no 151)’ (R90I,p239), so does J. de Tarade (1879/04/27; R90I,p244); both call it ‘incomplete’. Silvestre (1879/04/24) sums it up as one of the ‘Marines de banlieue (nos 161, 151 et 149)’ (R90I,p240). I give CR534 as an uncertain option. It was purchased by De Bellio in 1879 or 1880. This work was (also) exhibited at the Esposition Universelle in 1900 (no.479) (R22). Monet painted many pictures of Vétheuil. See info no.141.

4IE-1879-152, Parc Monceaux, appartient à M. de Bellio
Wildenstein suggests CR468; Berson follows. It was bought by De Bellio 1878/06/02 (R22). There were no reviews. Moffett gives CR466 as second option, but this work probably was purchased by Collot 1878/06/02 (R22), so I won’t render it as a second option.  See info 3IE-1877-96.

4IE-1879-153, bords de la Seine, environs de Paris, appartient à M. Chabrier
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR456. There were no reviews (R90I,p115). This work was purchased by Chabrier 1878/04 (R22). Compare and see info no.139

4IE-1879-154, La rue Saint-Denis, fête du 30 juin 1878 .
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR470. See info no.145. There were several reviews (R90II,p115). Rue Saint-Denis seems to be an incorrect title (see CR469). Bought by Ernst Hoschedé 1878/07. Painted from the balcony of 141, Rue Saint-Denis, Paris (R22)

4IE-1879-155, Un jardin (1867), appartient à M. Lecadre
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR68; so does Kostenevich (R15,p166). There were a few reviews (R90II,p116). Wildenstein suggests it was painted in 1866. Kostenevich opposes this suggestion, claiming it was made in the summer of 1867, when Monet spent with his family in Sainte-Adresse and when he was working on 20 paintings as he wrote to Bazille (R15,p164). See info 2IE-1876-151. Jean-Marguerite Lecadre was a distant cousin of Monet (R22) or the wife of a cousin (R15,p164). The garden is of the Lecadre family home, 16, rue des Phares, Sainte-Adresse (corner Rue du Manoir).

4IE-1879-156, Église de Vétheuil, appartient à M. Schlessinger
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR474. There were no reviews (R90II,p116). Bought by De Bellio in 1878 and by Schlessinger around 1879 (R22). This church was just around the corner of Monet his house in Vétheuil. See info no.141.

4IE-1879-157, Jardin à Sainte-Adresse (1867), appartient à M. Frat
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR95; so does Scheider (R14,p158). There were a few reviews (R90II,p116). This painting shows a terrace at the Sentier Alphonse-Karr, Sainte-Adresse. In the background we see Jeanne-Marguerite Lecadre again, with her father Adolphe Lecadre. In the foreground we see Monet his father Adolphe Monet; for the woman in the foreground Wildenstein suggests his aunt Lecadre; Schneider suggests Sophie Lecadre (R22;R14,p158). See info 4IE-1879-155 and 2IE-1876-151.

4IE-1879-158, Les Charbonniers (1875), appartient à M. Hayem
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR365. The Asnières road bridge is visible and in the background the Clichy bridge; see location: . Note: this is one of the only or few paintings of Monet with a social-realist theme.

4IE-1879-159, Effet de neige (1875) à Argenteuil, appartient à M. Durand Ruel
Nor Wildenstein, nor Moffett, nor Berson give a suggestion. Berson refers to reviews that also can refer to no.144 (R90II,p116). My suggestion, CR348, is also purchased by Durand-Ruel (around 1876) and made in the winter of 1874/75 (R22). (For info on Argenteuil see 2IE-1876-148)

4IE-1879-160, La Mare, effet de neige, appartient à M. Durand Ruel
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR350. Bought by Durand-Ruel on the Hôtel Drouot sale 1875/03/24. Painted close to Monet’s house in Argenteuil (see also). (R22)

4IE-1879-161, Lavacourt, temps gris .
Wildenstein doesn’t give a suggestion. Moffett ? Pickvance suggest CR476 as suggestion with a perhaps; Berson follows. I can only find a black and white picture. Compare CR475 in no.149 which is a quite similar picture.

4IE-1879-162, Chemin de halage à Lavacourt, appartient à M. Murer
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest CR496. Part of the Murer collection since 1878/12 (R22). See no.149 for info on Lavacourt.

4IE-1879-163, Étude de mer, appartient à M. Guillemet
Wildenstein doesn’t give a suggestion; Moffett / Pickvance suggest with a perhaps CR112; Berson follows. E.C. only mentions the title (R90I,p214).  De Syène (1879/05/01) reviews ‘It is the invigorating breezes of the ocean that blow through Monet’s seascapes. L’Étude de mer, l’Estacade de Trouville, are painted in a fair and true range (of colours);’ (R90I,p243). This review doesn’t contradict the CR112 option, but doesn’t affirm it either. Wildenstein only mentions CR69 as a work, that was probably part of Guillemet his collection; but this depicts the Sainte-Adresse garden of Le coteau (R22). I will render CR112 as ‘maybe’ exhibited. For other marines see 3IE-1877-104+ 110; 4IE-1879-140. For info on Sainte-Adresse see 2IE-1876-151.

4IE-1879-164, Coucher du soleil, appartient à M. de Bellio
Wildenstein doesn’t give a suggestion; Moffett suggests CR362 with a perhaps, but he gives it also as an option for no.165. Berson affirms the choice for CR362. Only E.R. mentions the title this work (R90I,p237), further on there are no reviews. CR362 depicts the former Grande Rue of Argenteuil and was purchased by de Bellio 1878/06/19. I think the title ‘coucher du soleil’ better fits with CR362.

4IE-1879-165, Paysage d’hiver, appartient à M. de Bellio
Wildenstein gives CR362 with a ?, Moffett with a perhaps, but Moffett also suggests this one for no.164; he gives CR356 as a second option, depicting a train in the snow in the station of Argenteuil and purchased by De Bellio 1876/11. Berson affirms this choice for CR356. There were no reviews. I follow Moffett and Berson.

4IE-1879-166, Le petit bras à Vétheuil, appartient à M. de Bellio
Wildenstein doesn’t give a suggestion; Moffett / Pickvance with a perhaps CR481; Berson affirms. Wildenstein doesn’t affirm this work belonged to De Bellio. Fournel (1879/05/25) reviews “le Petit bras à Vétheuil” in front of which I anxiously asked myself, widening my eyes, whether it is a child’s arm or an arm of the Seine.’ (R90I,p221). Le Soir (1879/04/12) just mentions ‘une vue du petit bras à Vetheuil (no 166)’ (R90I,p241). X (1879/05/10) reviews ‘… le Petit bras, à Vétheuil. – This is exactly the two-tiered picture of the Cicada. – It would be just as nice upside down, maybe even more so!’ (R90I,p252). The painting fits the review of X, but this also could apply to other paintings of Monet. I follow Moffett and Berson. See info about Vétheuil no.141.

4IE-1879-166+hc1, Foreground with Dahlias .
Wildenstein doesn’t mention a picture outside the catalogue; Moffett does and suggests CR383 (=2IE-1876-159), CR385, CR417 (=3IE-1877-93), CR418 (=3IE-1877-112) or CR453. Berson affirms the last one. E.C. (1879/04/11) reviews ‘Thus among the twenty-five or thirty paintings of M. Claude Monet, exhibited this year, I counted up to four very accurate, very true, very sincere ones; Lavacourt (no 149), Chemin de Hallage à Lavacourt (no. 162), Etude de Mer (no 163), and a fourth which bears no number, but in the foreground is decorated with dahlias in bloom.’ (R90I,p214)
I render CR453 as maybe exhibited.

4IE-1879-166+hc2 unknown title (Vétheuil, temps gris).
4IE-1879-166+hc3 unknown title (Vétheuil).
Moffett and Berson suggest just one work being exhibited outside the catalogue. Still, Pickvance mentions that in a lettre dated 1879/05/01 Caillebotte promisses Monet, that the two canvases Monet sent, would be at the exposition. One is described as ‘temps gris’ (R2,p265). It probably were two paintings just finished in Vétheuil. Wildenstein doesn’t give a ‘temps gris’ painted in this period, so I render CR518, Vétheuil in the Fog, 60×71, Marmottan, as uncertain option for hc2. For hc3 I render two uncertain suggestions: CR533, ‘Vétheuil’, 60×81, NGV Melbourne; and: CR529, 1879, The Seine at Vetheuil, 54×73, private (iRx;R22+R127,CR529;R2,p265).

 

 

The seventh impressionist exposition of 1882:

General overview:

  • catalogue numbers 57-91
  • in total 35 works exhibited, all oil paintings
    • 15x indication of place (6x Vétheuil; 5x (the cliffs of Grainval / Fécamps / Petit Dalles)
    • 3x indication of time, season or weather
    • 0x a study
    • 4 loans (appartient à…)
  • See for the suggestions Moffett (1986=R2,p395), Berson (1996=R90II,p204-207+219-224). They refer to the older Catalogue Raisonné (=CR) of Wildenstein (1874-91=R127). I mainly use the newer Catalogue Raisonné (=CR) of Wildenstein, who uses the same numbers as the older one and uses additional with alphabetical letters (1996=R22; see online version on iR182).

The catalogue numbers (R2,p394;R90I,p377;iR1):

7IE-1882-57, Fleurs de Topinambours, appartient à M. Cahuzac
Now: CR629, 1880, Jerusalem Artichoke Flowers, 100×73, NGA Washington (iRx;R22,no629;R90II,p204+219;R2,p395+401;M21).

7IE-1882-58, Les glaçons, appartient à M. Charpentier
Now: CR568, 1880, Floating Ice, 97×151, SM Vermont (iR2;R22,no568;R90II,p204+219;R2,p395+402). This work was rejected for the Salon of 1880. This painting is one of a small serie of paintings (CR559-572) of the break up of the ice on the Seine near Vétheuil after 5/1/1880 after the great freeze of December 1879 (see serie CR552-558). (see also 7IE-1882-85).

7IE-1882-59, Entrée du petit bras de la Seine à Vétheuil 
W+M CR601. (
see info about Vétheuil 1879-141)

7IE-1882-60, Marine
Nor Wildenstein, nor Moffett, nor Berson give a suggestion. Marine (Eng.: sea view) is a very broad title and hard to identify. Berson (R90II,p204) refers to a review of Hennequin (1882/03/11), that also could apply to no.74: ‘I like his Marines less, where the rocks are too pink, and the sea too purple. ‘ (R90I,p393). As a very uncertain suggestion I give 1882, CR771, Sunset on the sea, off Pourville, 54×73, private (iRx;R22,no771;R2,p395). See for other Marines 3IE-1877-104+110; 4IE-1879-140; 7IE-1882-74.

7IE-1882-61, Sur falaise à Grainval
Wildenstein give CR655 with a ? as suggestion, Moffett follows with a perhaps. Berson also mentions this suggestion. I render it as perhaps exhitbited: CR655, 1881, View Taken from Grainval, 61×81, private (iR2;R22,no655;R90II,p204+219;R2,p395). In the painting Cape Fagnet is seen in the background, see Google-maps. In 1881 Monet painted a serie of paintings of cliffs and sea-views around Fécamp,   Grainval and   Les Petites-Dallasall at the Normandy coast between Le Havre and Dieppe (see). Monet showed several of them in this seventh impressionist exposition, see 7IE-1882-(64), 66, 67, 73, 76, 77, 83, 87.

7IE-1882-62, Soleil couchant, sur la Seine, effet d’hiver
Now: CR576, Sunset on the Seine (at Lavacourt), Winter Effect, 100×152, MPP Paris (iR2;R22,no576;R90II,p204+219;R2,p395+403;M4).

7IE-1882-63, Femme lisant dans un jardin
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest: CR681, 1881, The terrace at Vétheuil, 81×65, private (iR10;iR64;iR59;R22,no681;R90II,p204+219;R2,p395). Berson refers to one review of Fichtre who calls this work ‘Femme dans un bosquet’ (R90II,p205): ‘It is immediately clear that the unfortunate woman has been dead for a long time, as she is falling into decay. Distressing effect;’ (R90I,p387).

7IE-1882-64, Bateau échoué
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest: CR645, 1881, Boats Lying at Low Tide at Fecamp, 80×66, private (iRx;R22,no645;R90II,p205+220;R2,p395) Note: plural in the title and on the painting two boats lying at low tide. Maybe CR644 is a better suggestion; the title is singular, as in the catalogue of 1882, and the painting shows one boat: 1881, CR644, Boat lying at Low Tide (at Fécamp), 80×60, Tokyo FAM (iR2;iR8;R22,no644;R2,p394). Berson (R90II,p205) refers to a review of La Fare (1882/03/02), who just mentions the work (R90I,p400)  and of Jean de Nivelle (1882/03/04) ‘And it is the same painter who painted this Bateau échoué, a schooner lying on its side, at low water, with a great effect, as well as the distant view of the port, on which its masts and clamps are detached with great care.’ (R90I,p406). This review could apply to CR645 as well as CR644. Wildenstein mentions that Durand-Ruel bought CR645 in May 1881. CR644 first owner was a Catholina Lamert. This pleads for the choice of CR645. Still I will render CR644 as an option.

7IE-1882-65, Église de Vétheuil
Wildenstein suggests CR473 with a ?, Moffett follows with a perhaps. Berson also renders this option: 1881, CR473, The Church at Vétheuil, 61×81, private (iR6;R22,no473;R90II,p205+220;R2,p395). Silvestre (1882/03/11) reviews ‘L’Église that carries number 65 is bathed in a wonderful light.’ (R90I,p413); note: this is not typically true for CR473. CR473 looks very much as CR474, see 4IE-1879-156. (See info about Vétheuil at 4IE-1879-141)

7IE-1882-66, Marée basse, vue prise sur les falaises de Fécamps
Wildenstein suggests CR650 with a ?, Moffett is more sure, Berson follows: CR650, Calm Weather, Fécamp, 60×74, Km Basel (iR2;R22,no650;R90II,p205+220;R2,p395). (see info no.61)

7IE-1882-67, La mer du haut des falaises
Now: CR648, 1881, The Sea seen from the Cliffs, 60×75, private (iR2;R22,no648;R90II,p205+220;R2,p395+385). (see info no.61)

7IE-1882-68, Vétheuil, effet de neige
Wildenstein suggests for no.68 or 72 CR508; Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion. Berson leaves the work unidentified. I will render CR508 for no. 68. Silvestre (1882/03/11) reviews ‘What desolation in this view of Vétheuil (No 68), covered with snow like a shroud and whose trees sway like skeletons against a desolate sky!’ (R90I,p413). Nélesque (1882/03/19) reviews ‘randomly cover a canvas with several colours, even if they clash. This is the procedure used by M. Monet in the works that represent no 67 and 68; one the sea from the top of the cliff and the other a snow effect.’ (R90I,p405). See more info at no.72. (See info about Vétheuil at 4IE-1879-141)

7IE-1882-69, Chrysanthèmes , appartient à M. C. (=Gustave Caillebotte)
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson suggest: 1880, CR635, Red Chrysanthemums, 82×65, private (iR10;iR94;R22,no635;R90II,p205+220;R2,p395).

7IE-1882-70, Un coin du jardin à Vétheuil
Wildenstein suggests CR683 or 684; Moffett and Berson follow. Option 1: 1881, CR683, The Artist’s Garden at Vétheuil, 100×81, NSM Pasadena (M43;iR10;iR6;R22,no683;R90II,p205+220;R2,p395). Option 2: CR684, 1881, The Artist’s Garden at Vétheuil, 100×80, private (iR2;R22,no684;R90II,p205+221;R2,p395). Note: the garden of Monet in Vétheuil was at the other side of what now is Avenue Claude Monet, see info 4IE-1879-141. The garden is going downhill towards the Seine, which was to been from the back of the garden, see CR690.

7IE-1882-71, Inondation
Now: 1881, CR642, The flood, 60×100, Rau Zurich (iR10;iR64;R22,no642;R90II,p205+221;R2,p395). Note: Monet made a little serie of the floods in the surroundings of Vétheuil (CR638-642); CR639 was purchased by Durand-Ruel 1881/02. There were no contemporary reviews (R90II,p205). So CR639 also could be an option: 1881, CR639, Vétheuil, flooded meadow, 60×74, A1981/11/30 (iR10;iR235;iR15;iR6;R22,no639;R90II,p205;R2,p395).

7IE-1882-72, Vétheuil, effet de neige
Wildenstein suggests for no.68 or 72 CR508; Moffett doesn’t give a suggestion; Berson leaves the works unidentified. This picture has much resemblance with CR509 and 510. They all show the entrance of Vétheuil from the road from La Roche-Guyon (compare no.75), with the block of houses to the left of wich the last house is Monet’s, see info 4IE-1879-141. Berson renders several reviews who mostly could refer to no.68 and 72 (R90II,p205). Hennequin (1882/03/11) reviews ‘His eye is sometimes too fond of pink and lilac, but when these hues serve him, like in his Glaçons, his Effets de neige, the obtained aspect is of a penetrating and exquisite harmony.’ (R90I,p393). Rivière (1882/04/08) just mentions ‘his beautiful landscapes of Vétheuil in the snow’ (R90I,p409). Flor just mentions his ‘snow effects’ (R90I,p388). Chesnau just mentions ‘La Neige à Vétheuil’ (R90I,p385). Hustin (1882/03/10) just mentions ‘his Vétheuil seen in winter’ (R90I,p396).

7IE-1882-73, Falaises des petites Dalles
Option 1 of 2: CR621, 1880, The Cliffs of Les Petites-Dalles, 59×75, MFA Boston (iR2;R22,no621;R90II,p205+221;R2,p395+384). Option 2 of 2: CR665, 1880, Cliffs of Les Petites-Dalles, 60×81, unknown (iR10;iR94;R22,no665;R90II,p205+221;R2,p395). (See info no.61)

7IE-1882-74, Marine
Wildenstein, Moffett nor Berson give a suggestion. See also no60. As a very uncertain suggestion I render: 1882, CR708, Falaise près de Dieppe, 59×79, private (iR51;iR142;R22,no708;R2,p395).

7IE-1882-75, Château de la Roche-Guyon
Now: CR643, 1881, The chateau of La Roche-Guyon, 60×80, private (R22.no75;R90II,p206+221;R2,p395). Château de la Roche-Guyon is on the road from Vétheuil to Bennecourt; see on google-maps

7IE-1882-76, Étude de mer vue des hauteurs
=1881, CR649, sea study seen from the cliffs, 60×81, private (iR10;iR135;R22,no649;R90II,p206+221;R2,p395). There were no reviews, only La Far mentions the work (R90II,p206). Maybe CR647, also bought by Durand-Ruel, is also an option: CR647, 1881, Seascape near Fécamp, 60×81, private (iR2;R22,no647;R2,p394). (See info no.61).

7IE-1882-77, A Grainval, près de Fécamp
Now: CR653, At Grainval, near Fécamps, 61×80, private (iR2;R22,no653;R90II,p206+222;R2,p395+404) View on Cape Fagnet. (see info no.61)

7IE-1882-78, Bouquet de soleils
Now: CR628, 1880, Bouquet of Sunflowers, 101×82, Metropolitan (iRx;R22,no628;R90II,p206+222;R2,p395+405).

7IE-1882-79, Vétheuil
Wildenstein doesn’t give a suggestion; Moffett suggests CR598, Berson follows: 1880, CR598, The Island of flowers, 65×81, Metropolitan (iR10;iR6;iR59;R22,no598;R90II,p206+222;R2,p395;M23). There were no contemporary reviews (R90II,p206). It was purchased by Durand-Ruel in 1881 (R22,no598). But the emphasize in this picture lies on the Island of Flowers, not an Vétheuil. Monet made many views on Vétheuil. Several were bought by Durand-Ruel before the 7th ‘impressionist’ exposition, like CR591;601(=no59);602;605; 607; 609;693;704. I give CR605, which is part of a serie of views on Vétheuil (CR602-609) as an extra option: CR605, 1880, Vétheuil in summer, 60×100, Metropolitan (iR2;R22,no605;R90II,p206;R2,p395). (See 4IE-1879-151 for info on Vétheuil).

7IE-1882-80, Glaïeuls
7IE-1882-81, Glaïeuls
Wildenstein, Moffett and Berson give CR694 and 695 as the two options for these two numbers: 1.: CR694, 1881 Gladioli, 99×41, private (iRx;R22,no694;R90II,p206+222;R2,p395); and 2.: CR696, 1881 Gladioli, 65×87, private (iRx;R22,no696;R90II,p206+222;R2,p395). Monet made some more pictures with gladioli, see CR414, 415, 472, 692.

7IE-1882-82, Gibiers, nature morte
Wildenstein gives CR550 with a ?; Moffett suggests two options 549 and 550, Berson follows Moffett. These works are part of a little serie (CR549-551). As far as I can see, none of these paintings only represent pheasants. Anyway, none of these were bought by Durand-Ruel. There were several reviews (R90II,p206). Sallanches (1882/03/03) describes ‘On a table are four sparkling golden pheasants;’ (R90I,p412), which rules out CR551, which depicts 3 pheasants / birds. Option 1 of 2: CR550, 1879, Pheasants and Lapwings, 68×90, Minneapolis IA (iRx;R22,no550;R90II,p206+222;R2,p395+381): and: Option 2 of 2: CR549, 1879, Pheasants, 68×90, private (iR10;iR94;R22,no549;R90II,p206+223;R2,p395) (iRx;R22,no550;R90II,p206+222;R2,p395+381).

7IE-1882-83, Le matin au bord de la mer
Now: CR651, 1881, Morning by the Sea, 61×81, private (iR2;R22,no651;R90II,p206+223;R2,p395). (See info no.61)

7IE-1882-84, Sur la côte à Trouville
Now: CR687, 1881, On the Coast at Trouville, 60×81, MFA Boston (iRx;R22,no687;R90II,p206+223;R2,p395;M22). Trouville lies south of Le Havre, see on Google maps

7IE-1882-85, Les glaçons
Wildenstein has no suggestion; Moffett suggests CR569, Berson follows: CR569, 1880, Breakup of ice, 59×99, SOR Winterthur (iR6;R22,no569;R90II,p206+223;R2,p395;M87). This work is part of a larger serie of the breakup of ice on the Seine near Vétheuil (CR559-572). The following of them were bought by Durand-Ruel: CR559, 564, 565, 566, 569. There were several reviews that also could refer to no.58 (R90II,p206). I render CR569 as maybe exhibited. (See info no.58)

7IE-1882-86, Les coquelicots.
Wildenstein suggests CR535 with a ?: 1879, CR535, The Meadow, 79×98, JAM Omaha (iR10;i64;R22,no535;R2,p395); probably also exhibited at  La Vie Moderne (LVM-1880-5). A work that has much resemblance with CR536. Monet gives a variation of the theme and suggests CR677 with a perhaps, Berson follows: CR677, 1881, Poppy Field, 58×79, MBB Rotterdam (iR2;R22,no677;R90II,p206+223;R2,p395). There were several reviews (R90II,p206), but most don’t give a description. Jacques de Biez (1882/03/08) writes about a sober execution (R90I,p380); which pleads for CR535. Hennequin (1882/03/11) reviews ‘His Coquelicots launched in the sunlight a superb red rocket.’ (R90I,p393), which pleads more for CR677. Huysmans reviews ‘and a field of poppies flaming under a pale sky, of an admirable colour.’ (R90I,p398), which also pleads for CR677. I will render them both.

7IE-1882-87, Du haut des falaises à Fécamp
Wildenstein suggests with a ? CR656: CR656, 1881, The Cliff at Fécamp, 64×80, Aberdeen AGM (iR2;R22,no656;R2,p394). Moffett doesn’t follow. Berson leaves it unidentified. There is a review of Un Passant, who mentions ‘Falaises de Fécamp’, which could refer to no. 87 or 66; furthermore there were no reviews (R90II,p207). Monet made several views from on high of the cliffs of Fécamp, so there are several possibilities. I follow Wildenstein. (see info no.61)

7IE-1882-88, Sentier dans les blés
Wildenstein gives CR676 with a ?; Moffett follows with a perhaps; Berson follows: CR676, 1881, Field of Corn, 66×82, Cleveland MA (iRx;R22,no676;R90II,p207+223;R2,p395;M27). The only review is of De Charry, who just mentions this work (R90I,p384). Painted in the plains of Lavacourt

7IE-1882-89, Sentier dans l’Île St-Martin
Probably: 1881, CR678, Lane in Ile Saint-Martin, 73×60, Philadelphia MA (iR51;iR6;iR64;R22,no678;R90II,p207+224;R2,p395;M28). Moffett also suggests CR592: CR592, 1880, Lane in the Poppy Field, Ile Saint-Martin, 80×60, Metropolitan (iR2;R22,no592;R2,p395+406;M23). L’Île Saint-Martin is a large island between Vétheuil and Lavacourt, see Google-maps.

7IE-1882-90, Paysage d’été, Île St-Martin
Wildenstein suggests CR679 with a ?; Moffett follows with a perhaps; Berson also follows: CR679, 1881, landscape in Ile Saint-Martin, 73x60cm, private (iRx;R22,no679;R90II,p207+224;R2,p395). (see no.89)

7IE-1882-91, Les Saules, appartient à M. Cahuzac
Wildenstein and Moffett suggest CR611 or 612. Berson just renders the first, but also mentions the second: Option 1 of 2: CR611, 1880, The willows, 66×82, CGA Washington (iR2;R22,no611;R90II,p207+224;R2,p395); and: Option 2 of 2: CR612, 1880, The willows at Vétheuil, 60×74, private (iR10;iR64;R22,no612;R90II,p207;R2,p395). The picture shows a view at Lavacourt from Île de Moisson.

 

 

Claude Monet at the Salon:
My main sources are the Salon database of Musée d’Orsay (=iR1) and the Catalogue Raisonné of Wildenstein (1996,=R22). For other references see at the bottom of the main page on Claude Monet .  Note: an artist often submitted two works at the Salon

 

S1865-1524: L’embouchure de la Seine à Honfleur
Now: CR51, 1865, Mouth of the Seine at Honfleur, 90×150, NSM Pasadena (iR51;iR1;R22,no51). Monet received positive critics (R2,p95)

S1865-1525: La Pointe de la Hève à marée basse,
N
ow: CR52, 1865, The Pointe de la Hève at Low Tide, 90×150, KAM Fort Worth (iR2;iR1;R22,no52).

S1866-1386: Camille
Now: Now: 1866, CR65, Camille (the woman with a green dress), 231×151, Kh Bremen (iR2;R22,no65;M58); sold to Arsène Houssaye (R2, p95)

S1866-1387 Forêt de Fontainebleau:
Now: CR19, 1864, Le pavé de Chailly, 98x130cm, private Switzerland (iR2;iR1;R22,no19). Also exhibited in 1886 in New York (DRNY-1886-183).

S1867-R1:
now: CR67, 1866, women in the garden, 256×208, Orsay (iR2;iR1;R22,no67;M1). Monet exhibited the painting in the Spring of 1867 at Latouche.

S1867-R2:
Now: 1866, CR77, Port of Honfleur, 148×226, destroyed during World War II. The next year in 1868 Monet had succes with this painting at an exhibition in Le Havre. To compare I render: 1866-67, CR77a, Boats in the Port of Honfleur, 49×65, private (iRx;R22,no77a); note: a much smaller picture.

S1868-1787 Navires sortant des jetées au Havre
This work is disappeared; 1867, CR89, Boats coming out of the Port of Le Havre. To compare I give: 1867, CR87, The entrance to the port of Honfleur, 50×61, NSM Pasadena (iR7;iR1;R22,no87+89;M43); CR87. This pictures has various resemblances with the caricatures that are known of CR89.

S1868-R: La Jetée du Havre
Now: CR109, 1868, La Jetée du Havre (The Jetty at Le Havre), 147×226, private (iRx;R22,no109).

S1869-R1
Now: CR126, 1868-69, Fishing Boats at Sea, 96×130, HSM Farmington (iRx;R22,no126;M39); Bought by Fauré

S1869-R2
Now: 1869, CR133, The Magpie, 89×130, Orsay (iR2;R22,no133;M1).

S1870-R1: Le Déjeuner
Now: 1868, CR132, The luncheon, 230×150, Städel Frankfurt (iR51;R87,p243;R2,p121;R90II,p24;R22+R127,CR132;R21,no39;M54,no170); later exhibited as: 1IE1874-103.

S1870-R2:
Probably: CR136, 1869/09, La Grenouillère, xx, destroyed WWII (iR10;iR135;R22+R127,CR136); bought by Durand-Ruel; also exhibited as 2IE-1876-164, Les bains de la Grenouillère. To compare I also give: 1869/09, CR134, La Grenouillère, 75×100, Metropolitan (M23,no.29.100.112;iR5;R2,p163;R90II,p59;R22+R127,CR134).

SdAF-1880-2681, Lavacourt
Now: CR578, 1880, (The Seine at) Lavacourt, 100×150, Dallas MA (iR2;iR1;R22,no578;M36)

SdAF-1880-R: Les glaçons
Now: CR568, 1880, Floating Ice, 97×151, SM Vermont (iR2;R22,no568).; later exhibited as: 7IE-1882-58.

 

Recommanded citation: “Claude Monet, an account of his exhibited works”. Last modified 2021/07/19.  https://www.impressionism.nl/monet-account/.