Guillaumin, locations

Impressionism, a historical reconstruction:

Armand Guillaumin

(1841-1927)

Locations

 

 

Where did Armand Guillaumin paint?
On this page you will find an overview of where Guillaumin did paint, with links to Google maps (iR9). I used the information in the Catalogue Raisonné of Serret & Fabiani from 1971 (=R124,p561/2), from Gray (R179), from Wikipedia (iR3-5) and Google maps (iR9). After 1892 Guillaumin developed a year rithm of dwelling early in the year in Agay, the early summer in Crozant, late summer in Saint-Palais-sur-Mer, the autumn again in Crozant and the winter in Paris (R179,p49). Some add travels to Brittany, Normandie and Dauphiné (R87,p238;R3;R9). Untill 1891 Guillaumin mostly painted in Paris (along the Seine) and in the surroundings of Paris, also called the Île-de-France. See link for the subscriptions and for the references at the bottom of the main page on Armand Guillaumin.

 

Armand Guillaumin painted in Paris:
Guillaumin hardly painted in Paris after 1891. Still, he had a house in Paris in 1904 and maybe also afterwards. He painted mostly along the Seine, rendering the quais, the bridges and people working.
Let’s walk along the Seine with Guillaumin, starting east of Paris at the left bank of the Seine coming from the south, turning to the west at the confluent with the Marne, where lies Ivry-sur-Seine and where Guillaumin often did paint. Let’s walk west ward, along the Quai d’Ivry, crossing the later build Boulevard Périphérique.  After the Pont National we walk over the Quai Panhard et Levassor, at the end it runs parallel with the Port de Tolbiac, untill the Pont de Tolbiac. After that we proceed at the Quai de la Gare (now partly called the Quai François Mauriac), running parallel with the Port de la Gare. After the Pont de Bercy, it proceeds in the Quai d’Austerlitz, near Gare d’Austerlitz, again parallel with the Port de la Gare. Halfway we cross the later build Pont de Charles de Gaulle. After the Pont d’Austerlitz we proceed at the Quai Saint-Bernard. Then we cross the Pont de Sully, connecting to the Île Saint-Louis, with it’s Quai de Béthune. Note: some works of Guillaumin are called Quai Sully, while there is no such Quai. We proceed at the Quai de la Tournelle. Half-way the Pont de la Tournelle connects the Île Saint-Louis with it’s Quai de Béthune and Quai d’Orléans. And further west the Pont de l’Archevêché connects the Île de la Cité. Shortly afterwards we proceed at the Quai de Montebello, halfway passing the Pont au double, that connect the Île de la Cité, with it’s Quai du Marché Neuf. After the Petit Pont we proceed at the Quai Saint-Michel. After the Pont Saint-Michel (that also connects Île de la Cité and it’s Quai des Orfèvres), we proceed at the Quai des Grands Augustins. After the Pont Neuf (that also connects Île de la Cité and it’s Quai des Orfèvres), we proceed at the Quai de Conti. After passing the Pont des Arts we shortly afterwards proceed at the Quai Malaquais. After the Pont des Carrousel we proceed at the Quai Voltaire. After the Pont Royale we proceed at the Quai d’Orsay (now partly called Quai Anatole France). First passing the Passerelle Léopold Sédar-Senghor (formerly known as Passerelle de Solférino), then the Pont de la Concorde (formerly also called Pont Louis XVI), then the Pont Alexandre III (build just before 1900), then the Pont des Invalides. After the Pont de l’Alma we proceed at the Quai Jacques Chirac (formerly the Quai Branly). After passing the passarelle Debilly it runs parallel with the Port de la Bourdonnais and after the Pont d’Iéna with the Port de Suffren. After the Pont de Bir-Hakeim (which connects the Île au Cygnes) we procede at the Quai (and Port) de Grenelle, till the Pont de Grenelle, which also connects the Île au Cygnes. Then we procede at the Quai André Citroën (formerly known as the Quai de Javel), more west ward also called Port de Javel Haute and after the Pont Mirabeau (built between 1895 and 1897) called Port de Javel Bas. Then we procede at the Quai d’Issy-les-Moulinaux, passing halfway the Pont du Garigliano (formerly there was the viaduc d’Auteuil or Point-du-Jour).
Than we cross the Pont Aval to the right / north bank of the Seine and walk east wards. First we walk at the Quai Saint-Exupéry. Passing the Pont du Garigliano (formerly there was the viaduc d’Auteuil or Point-du-Jour) we procede at the Quai Louis Blériot (formerly known as the Quai d’Auteuil). We pass the Pont Mirabeau (built between 1895 and 1897). After the Pont de Grenelle, which also connects the Île au Cygnes we procede at the Avenue du Président Kennedy, halfway crossing the Pont de Bir-Hakeim (which connects the Île au Cygnes), after a while proceding in the Avenue New York, which runs parallel with the Port Debilly, halfway passing the Pont d’Iéna and later the Passerelle Debilly. After the Pont de l’Alma we procede at the Port de la Conférence and the Port des Champs-Élysées, crossing the Pont des Invalides and later the Pont Alexander III. After a short while it runs parallel with the Port de la Concorde, which later runs parallel with the Quai des Tuilleries. First we cross the Pont de la Concorde (formerly also called Pont Louis XVI) and later the Passerelle Léopold Sédar-Senghor (formerly known as Passerelle de Solférino), till we reach the Pont Royal. There we procede  in the Quai du Louvre (part of it is now renamed in the Quai François Mitterand). We first cross the Pont du Caroussel (rebuild and formerly also called Pont du Louvre), then the Pont des Arts, till the Pont Neuf (that leads to the Île de la Cité, with it’s Quai d’Horloge). Then we procede on the Quai de la Mégisserie till the Pont au Change ((that also leads to the Île de la Cité, with it’s Quai  de la Corse). Then we procede on the Quai de Gesvres (with in the middle the Pont de Notre-Dame), untill the Pont d’Arcole (which also leads to the Île-de-la-Cité and it’s Quai aux Fleurs). Then we procede the Quai de l’Hôtel de Ville, with in the middle Pont Louis Philippe (which leads to Île Saint-Louis, with it’s Quai de Bourbon) ending at the Pont Marie (which also leads to Île Saint-Louis, with it’s Quai d’Anjou). Then we procede on the Quai des Célestins, untill the Pont de Sully (which also leads to Île Saint-Louis, with it’s Quai d’Anjou). Then we procede on the Quai Henri IV, crossing the Pont Morland, we procede on the Quai de la Rapée, soon crossing the Pont d’Austerlitz, later the Pont Charles de Gaulle (build in 1996), parallel walking with the Port de la Rapée. Walking further eastwards we cross the Pont de Bercy, the Passerelle Simone de Beauvoir (build between 2004 and 2006) and the Pont de Tolbiac (built between 1879 and 1882). After the Pont National, the Quai de Bercy proceeds, but the parallel Port de Bercy has stopped. Then we cross the modern Boulevard de Périphérique, we cross the Paris boundary and procede in Charenton-le-Pont (opposite of Ivry), whith it’s Quai de Charenton on the right bank of the Seine, proceding on the right bank of the Marne at the conjunction of the Seine and the Marne. In the meanwhile we have crossed the Pont de Nelson Mandela Aval (=downstream) and Amont (=upstream) and the Passerelle d’Ivry-Charenton.

Guillaumin painted in Île-de-France, the region around Paris.
Till 1891 Guillaumin mostly painted in Paris and it’s surroundings, also called the Île-de-France. This includes from the west to the east:  Pontoise and close by Auvers-sur-Oise, about 35km north-west of Paris (mainly from about 1873-79; not mentioned in R124). In Sannois 25km north-west (in 1919). In Billancourt, just west of Paris (not mentioned in R124) and just north of it lies Auteuil.
South of Paris we find (from the west to the east): Issy-les-Moulineaux, (in 1874+77+78); to the east in Vanves, just south of Paris (not mentioned in R124); more to the east lies Arcueil and further more to the east lies Ivry-sur-Seine at the conjunction of the Seine and the Marne (here he painted in 1869+73+87+ 91+1900). Opposite Ivry at the other bank of the Seine lies Alfortville (in 1873). Just north of Ivry at the opposite site of the Seine lies Charenton, just east of Paris (from 1873-93 regularly +1903; see also above at Paris).
More to the south we find (from west to east):
Meudon (opposite of Billancourt), than to the east Clamart, south of Issy (not mentioned in R124); than further to the east you find Châtillon (not mentioned in R124), just south of Châtillon lies Fontenay-aux-Roses (not mentioned in R124), than further to the east Bagneux , to the south-east L’Haÿ-les-Roses and more east lies Vitry-sur-Seine on the left bank of the Seine, that streams from the south to the north.
Then in a wider circle around Paris we find: Palaiseau, which lies about 23km south of Paris (not mentioned in R124); Epinay-sur-Orge which lies about 25km south of Paris (in 1880+84+88+89); Damiette which lies about 35km south of Paris (in 1882+86+89+90) and which is a former village in the Chevreuse valley, now part of Saint-Rémy-de-Chevreuse  (in 1912); Breuillet, about 43km south of Paris (in 1889+90); Saint-Chéron, about 46km south of Paris (in 1885+90+92+93+1901); Boigneville, about 70km south of Paris (in 1893+94); Fleury-en-Bière , about 57km south-east of Paris (not mentioned in R124); Samois(-sur-Seine), about 65km south-east (in 1898+1900+1902); Moret, about 80km south-east (in 1896+1902; note: Sisley lived here and in it’s surroundings from 1880-99); Villiers-sur-Morin, about 46km east of Paris (in 1905).
Just outside the Île-de-France, Guillaumin painted in Compiègne, which lies about 80km north-east of Paris.

 

Guillaumin painted in Normandie and Brittany and along the Bay of Biscay:
Guillaumin painted in Normandie. In 1881 in Dieppe. In Rouen, about 150km north-west of Paris (in 1898+1904; R179,p58). In Clézy(-sur-Orne), about 260km (south-)west of Paris (in 1891+1903) and also in 1903 in Vézalay-sur-Orne, which I could not find. In Carolles, about 350km (south-)west of Paris (in 1900+02). In Saint-Servan, about 400km (south-)west of Paris, in 1895+1900. In Val-André, which maybe is about 440 (south-)west of Paris, in 1907.
In 1873 Guillaumin spend some weeks in Jullouville in the Manche departement of Brittany (R179,p43).
Guillaumin also painted along the Bay of Biscay, which stretches from the Brittany peninsula unto Spain. In Pornic, which lies about 50km west of Nantes, in 1908 (R179,p59). In Île-de-Ré in 1892 (R179,p48). From 1892-1919 he also painted regularly in Saint-Palais, which lies about 143km north-west of Bordeaux. In the late 1880s and the early 1890s he also painted in Breuillet (R179,p48).

 

Guillaumin painted in Crozant and it’s surroundings.
Crozant lies in the Creuse department, 330km south of Paris, he yearly painted here from 1891-1923. He also painted in the region (which is not mentioned in R124). In (the valley of) Sedelle, about 15km south of Crozant. In Bouchardon, about 18km south of Crozant. In Genetin and in Puy-Barriou, but I could not find places close by with these names. He often visited Limoges, about 82km south-west of Crozant (R179,p60). He would repeatedly paint the same motives: (the dam at) Génetin, Moulin Bouchardon, Moulin Brigand, Pont Charraud, Les Ruines de Château, Le Rocher de l’Écho and Les Bréjots. (R179,p61).

 

Guillaumin painted in several places in the south-east of France:
Jouy, 95km south of Paris, in 1888+1901. In Villeneuve-sur-Yonne in 1905, about 135km south-east of Paris. In Poitiers, about 340km south-west of Paris (in 1895+1910).
About 380km south of Paris lies Pontgibaud, west of Clermont-Ferrand, in the Puy-de-Dôme department, in the former county the Auvergne. Here he painted in 1889+90+95+99. Note: the family of his mother came from this district; R179,p13. Pontcharraud, lies about 53km west of Pontgibaud; here he painted from 1894-1920 regularly. In 1889 he painted in Peschadoires, about 61km east of Pontgibaud (R179,p45). In 1900 in Saint-Sauves, about 33km south of Pontgibaud. In 1895 in Saint-Julien-des-Chazes, about 121km south-east of Pontgibaud. In 1890+1900+01 and for the last time in 1913, in Pontcharra, about 300km east of Pontgibaud (R179,p59).
I could not find Miregaudon, where he painted in 1892.

 

Guillaumin painted in the Côte d’Azur.
Le Midi is the part of France along the Mediterranean sea. The Côte d’Azur is the eastern part from the Italien border till about Saint-Tropez. The French Rivièra is most east part of the Côte d’Azur around Nice and Menton (iR4).
From 1889-1923 Guillaumin regularly painted in this region, especially in Agay, between Cannes and Saint-Tropez. Here he often painted the Red Rocks. From 1895-1919 he also painted regularly in Le Trayas, about 10km to the north-east. He would also paint in the surroundings: In Esterel, 6km east of Agay (not mentioned in R124). In 1919+20 in Roquebrune + Cap Martin, which lies about 100km north-east. In 1900+02+11 in Le Brusq, about 115km south-west of Agay. Close by is Le Gaou, which maybe is the same place as Lou-Gaou, where he painted in 1911 (R179,p42).

 

Guillaumin made a trip to the Netherlands:
From 1903/09 till 1904/06 Guillaumin made a trip to the Netherlands, especially Zaandam (R179,p58;R3;R87,p238;R9). (Note: Duret dates this 1894; R7,p256. The RKD 1902-04; iR24). It was his first (and only) foreign trip (R179,p58). 5 of these works he would exhibit at the Salon d’Automne in 1904.

 

 

Recommanded citation: “Armand Guillaumin, locations; Where did Guillaumin paint? Last modified 2022/02/25. https://www.impressionism.nl/guillaumin-locations/